Immigration Blog

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"Silicon Valley Treats American Workers Like H-1Bs"

That should have been the New York Times headline for today's article about how the major IT employers have been sued "on claims of conspiring to keep their employees down".

Instead, the Times headline predicted the outcome of a class action suit by U.S. workers against Google, Apple, Intel, and Adobe with these words: "In Silicon Valley Thriller, a Settlement May Preclude the Finale".

Hair-splitting Judges Rule in Favor of Northern Border Coyote

The Third Circuit Court of Appeals has recently ruled that an admitted alien smuggler, who worked in upstate New York, should not be deported because he did not actually cross the border with the assisted illegals, thus blowing another hole in the already faltering efforts to enforce the immigration law.

The case also reminds us that illegal aliens don't sneak across the southern border only and that Indian reservations along either border complicate law enforcement there.

Fewer Deportations, More Repeat Offenders

For the second time in a very short span, I am writing about an immigration-related item to be found in the New York Times. Earlier this week, I commented on an article entitled "Hoping for Asylum, Migrants Strain U.S. Border".

Now I find myself looking retrospectively to an article which preceded that one by a matter of days, and feeling obliged to respond to some of the assertions that can be found within it. This article was published by the Times on April 6, with the heading "More Deportations Follow Minor Crimes, Records Show".

Giveaway to H-1B Employers Opens Huge Hole in USCIS Budget

The huge giveaway to H-1B employers previously described does major damage to the budget of USCIS.

Earlier we had reported that the agency was refunding H-1B employers something like one-third of a billion dollars a year in connection with fees previously paid for failed applications for H-1B slots, while not making similar repayments to ordinary naturalization applicants who had failed their citizenship tests.

Immigration Reform in a Republican-Controlled Senate, Pt. 2

The numbers count of any likely GOP Senate majority in the new Congress suggests that real immigration reform is by no means a forgone conclusion. Indeed, it could be rather iffy.

The ratio of Democrats to Republicans is important, as is control of the Senate. And the actual composition of the crucial Senate committees matters as well, and that certainly includes the Senate Judiciary that has primary (but shared) jurisdiction over immigration legislation.

A Catholic's Dissent from the Bishops' Immigration Policy

Download a PDF of this blog series

Like many Catholics, I have been bitterly disappointed in the church's negligence in its response to the pedophile priests. And as someone who thinks legal immigration should be reduced and illegal immigration should not be encouraged, I have been disappointed that the policy preferences of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops seem to be reducible to a slogan: "More green cards, less enforcement!"

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