Immigrant Population Growth Slows

‘Trump Effect’ likely explains slowdown

Recently released Census data shows the number of immigrants (legal and illegal) grew more slowly from 2017 to 2019 than in prior years.

In the first two years of the Trump administration, growth in the immigrant population averaged only about 200,000 a year, in contrast to 650,000 a year from 2010 to 2017.

Panel: Trump vs. Biden on Immigration

The Center for Immigration Studies hosted a panel analyzing the presidential candidates' positions on immigration and how immigration policy may be impacted by the November 3 election. Immigration has not been widely discussed by either presidential campaign, but the issue has a major impact on many issues Americans care strongly about, including jobs, wages, healthcare, the economy, law enforcement, and education.

Panel: Biometrics in Immigration

Promoting National Security and Community Safety

The Center for Immigration Studies hosted a conversation highlighting the Center's new report on the value of biometrics in immigration enforcement and how that relates to national security and public safety. 

Read report: Biometrics in Immigration

Panel: Overcrowded Housing Among Immigrant and Native-Born Workers

The Center for Immigration Studies hosted a panel discussing a new report, Overcrowded Housing Among Immigrant and Native-Born Workers

Dr. Peter Skerry, a professor of political science at Boston College and a past senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, joined Dr. Steven Camarota, the Center's director of research and co-author of the report.

 

New H-1B Rules to Protect American Workers

The new H-1B rules being announced today are long-overdue moves to protect American workers. These reforms strike directly at the harmful staffing-company model of employment that has commodified these visa workers, displaced qualified Americans, and undermined the integrity of employment visa programs.

Immigrant Population Growth Slows
Immigrant Population Growth Slows
Panel: Trump vs. Biden on Immigration
Panel: Trump vs. Biden on Immigration
Panel: Biometrics in Immigration
Panel: Biometrics in Immigration
Panel: Overcrowded Housing
Panel: Overcrowded Housing
New H-1B Rules
New H-1B Rules

‘Trump Effect’ likely explains slowdown

Recently released Census data shows the number of immigrants (legal and illegal) grew more slowly from 2017 to 2019 than in prior years.

In the first two years of the Trump administration, growth in the immigrant population averaged only about 200,000 a year, in contrast to 650,000 a year from 2010 to 2017.

The Center for Immigration Studies hosted a panel analyzing the presidential candidates' positions on immigration and how immigration policy may be impacted by the November 3 election. Immigration has not been widely discussed by either presidential campaign, but the issue has a major impact on many issues Americans care strongly about, including jobs, wages, healthcare, the economy, law enforcement, and education.

Promoting National Security and Community Safety

The Center for Immigration Studies hosted a conversation highlighting the Center's new report on the value of biometrics in immigration enforcement and how that relates to national security and public safety. 

Read report: Biometrics in Immigration

The Center for Immigration Studies hosted a panel discussing a new report, Overcrowded Housing Among Immigrant and Native-Born Workers

Dr. Peter Skerry, a professor of political science at Boston College and a past senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, joined Dr. Steven Camarota, the Center's director of research and co-author of the report.

 

The new H-1B rules being announced today are long-overdue moves to protect American workers. These reforms strike directly at the harmful staffing-company model of employment that has commodified these visa workers, displaced qualified Americans, and undermined the integrity of employment visa programs.

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Trump v. Biden Debate: Credible Fear No-Shows

Neither was correct, but statistics show credible fear process results in catch-and-release

In Thursday's debate, both candidates focused on the rate at which aliens entering illegally with children appeared – or not – at their subsequent removal proceedings. Neither had the right statistics, but the president was correct that the in absentia rate (those ordered removed because they failed to appear) reveals abuses in the credible-fear system.

More Noise than Light on 545 Children

A 'moral failing' or a parental choice? From Elian Gonzalez to zero tolerance

How many parents have the federal government and/or the ACLU been unable to locate? The parents of 545 children, or some lesser number? Are the 485 children referenced by DHS included in the ACLU's number? If so, have their parents made the decision that Elian Gonzalez's father declined to make 20 years ago, and opted to have their children remain with family members in the U.S.?

DOJ Releases MS-13 Report

74 percent of gang defendants charged were unlawfully present in the United States

On Wednesday, DOJ released "Full-Scale Response: A Report on the Department of Justice's Efforts to Combat MS-13 from 2016-2020". The most interesting — but not shocking — takeaway is that some 74 percent of the MS-13 defendants prosecuted by DOJ during the past four years are in the United States illegally.
Topics: Gangs