Immigration Blog

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No Illegal Alien Left Behind

Last year, the Obama administration reached a settlement that allows certain former illegal immigrants to return to the U.S. An agency in Mexico announced a campaign over the weekend to ensure that as many people as possible take advantage of it.

In 2013 the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and the government of California filed a class action lawsuit on behalf of nine Mexican nationals and three immigrant advocacy groups. The complaint in Lopez-Venegas v Johnson alleged ''that as a matter of regular practice, Border Patrol agents and ICE officers pressure undocumented immigrants to sign what amount to their own expulsion documents,'' formally known as "administrative voluntary departure.'' This is commonly referred to as ''voluntary return" and is an alternative to appearing before a judge and being formally deported.

Topics: Mexico

A Linguistic Bridge over Troubled Waters

Part two of four.Read Part 1: The Immigration Language Wars.

 

 

 

In 2013, when the Associated Press prohibited the use of "illegal immigrant" to describe someone who was in the United States illegally and the New York Times gave its blessing to the use of less controversial terms, critics complained that they caved in to pressure and surrendered to political correctness. I was waiting for someone to wisecrack that the two powerhouses of American journalism had made the difficult decision to rise above their principles.

Each Skilled Immigrant Creates 2.5 Jobs for Natives?

Immigrants with skill-based visas certainly bring some economic benefits, but one cost is the increased wage and employment competition faced by natives with similar skills. This is a not a trivial concern given that most "high-skill" H-1B immigrants are not exemplary — they're mostly run-of-the-mill college graduates who compete with middle-class natives.

Will the White House Shift Money Away from ICE?

The Daily Caller recently reported that the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) was going to propose shifting $110 million away from Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) into other DHS organizations and efforts such as the Secret Service and cybersecurity programs. The money targeted by the White House for "reprogramming", which would need congressional approval given the staggering amount, would come from ICE's immigration programs, not its customs programs.

The Immigration Language Wars

The first of four parts.

Public policy debates often feature clever terminology intended to frame the issue and thereby influence the way we think about it. We have negative framing with "death tax" instead of "estate tax" and "government takeover" instead of "national health insurance". And we have positive framing with "gaming" instead of "gambling" and "right to choose" instead of "abortion rights". If you change the name, you can change the frame, and that can change how the public responds.

The immigration debate has produced some important linguistic battles. The mother of all of them has been waged over the term "illegal immigrant".

Univision's Biased Reporting, Maryland Edition

In January, soon after taking office, Maryland Governor Larry Hogan decided to participate in the US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Priority Enforcement Program (PEP). Gov. Hogan's move is appropriate but very limited, merely cancelling former Governor Martin O'Malley's policy of non-cooperation with ICE; the state continues to give illegal immigrants in-state tuition and driver licenses, with some restrictions.

Immigration Trump Card

Maybe what is most remarkable about Trump's new immigration paper is that none of the other candidates beat him to it.

I mean no disrespect to his policy people, but anyone could have written it in a few days, a week maybe. The material is easily found online and unlike, say, health care policy, it's really not that complicated.

Which suggests that the campaigns of most of the other leading candidates hoped they could avoid offering an actual plan, finessing the issue instead by mouthing platitudes for the yahoos without specifics that might upset donors. Trump's paper takes direct aim at this strategy when it states "Real immigration reform puts the needs of working people first – not wealthy globetrotting donors."

Topics: Politics
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