Do Not Confuse Smuggling with Trafficking

The United Nations designated Sunday, July 30 as the "World Day against Trafficking in Persons" following a 2013 resolution to "raise awareness of the situation of victims of human trafficking and for the promotion and protection of their rights."

Trump Is Amnestying 192 New Illegals per Day

Shortly after inauguration, I wrote about the Trump administration's decision to continue the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) amnesty. During the campaign, Trump (correctly) lambasted Obama's unilateral amnesty program as illegal and pledged to stop it on day one. But not only did he not stop it, DHS has continued to process renewals and even new applications, for illegal aliens who did not already have this two-year renewable work permit.

Will No One Rid Me of These Turbulent Immigration Restrictionists?

In the under-appreciated film "Bowfinger" one of Eddie Murphy's characters is a paranoid movie-star nitwit who meticulously combs through a proposed script to count the number of times the letter K is used:

Kit: The letter K appears in this script 1,456 times. That's perfectly divisible by 3. Freddy: So what? So what you saying? Kit: What am I saying? KKK appears in this script 486 times!

"Temporary" Doesn’t Mean What You Think It Means

DHS Secretary John Kelly announced today that "Temporary Protected Status" for Haitians who were here illegally or on a visitor visa at the time of the 2010 earthquake would be extended yet again, for six months. In his statement he went to great pains to emphasize that this was really, for sure – probably; okay, well, maybe – the final extension:

This six-month extension should allow Haitian TPS recipients living in the United States time to attain travel documents and make other necessary arrangements for their ultimate departure from the United States, and should also provide the Haitian government with the time it needs to prepare for the future repatriation of all current TPS recipients.

No TPS grant to a large group of people has ever been allowed to end, so with high hope for the future, no prediction in regard to this is ventured.

Donald Trump, Immigration Booster

Whoever conducted the recent Economist interview with the president seems to be the first reporter ever to ask him whether he wants to reduce legal immigration. The answer is no:

Do you want to curb legal immigration? Oh sure, you know, I want to stop illegal immigration. And what about legal immigration? Do you want to cut the number of immigrants? Oh legal, no, no, no. I want people to come into the country legally. No, legally? No. I want people to come in legally. But I want people to come in on merit. I want to go to a merit-based system. Actually two countries that have very strong systems are Australia and Canada. And I like those systems very much, they’re very strong, they're very good, I like them very much. We’re going to a much more merit-based system. But I absolutely want talented people coming in, I want people that are going to love our country coming in, I want people that are going to contribute to our country coming in. We want a provision at the right time, we want people that are coming in and will commit to not getting ... not receiving any form of subsidy to live in our country for at least a five-year period.
Topics: Politics

Comey: 15% of Terror Cases Came as Refugees

The narrative about refugee resettlement spun by the invite-the-world crowd is that refugees pose no threat to Americans. To pick only the first link to pop up in Google, see this from VOA: "UNHCR: Refugees Pose No Threat to US National Security". This is because they are "rigorously vetted", "the most thoroughly vetted of all people entering our nation".The problem is that vetting is only as good as the information available. And we simply don’t have access to information that would successfully identify potential bad guys. In my testimony on this a while back I quoted FBI Director Comey:

Why Limit Immigration At All?

[This is the beginning of a long piece by me on the reasons for limiting immigration, that will appear in Saturday's print edition of the Wall Street Journal.]The immigration debate in the U.S. has been contentious for decades, but Donald Trump’s candidacy and election have taken it to a new level of polarized animosity. Politicians and the public have focused, understandably, on Mr. Trump’s promise to build a “big, beautiful” wall on the U.S.-Mexico border and on what should be done with the millions of illegal immigrants currently in the country.These are certainly important issues. But they are enforcement issues. They are less fundamental than a question that too often goes unaddressed in our debates: Why limit immigration at all? Almost everyone at least pays lip service to the need for limits of some kind, but we don’t often enough challenge each other to explain what limits we support and why.