Immigration Blog

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Robo-Restaurant

Who says we need mass immigration because there's no way to automate the service sector? CNN has a piece on a restaurant in Germany where you order and pay at tabletop touch-screens and the food is delivered down spiral rails from the kitchen above. (The BBC's story is here, and the restaurant's home page is here.) From the BBC story:

Toughest Sheriff in America

Sheriff Joe Arpaio in Phoenix gets attrition through enforcement:

About 16 percent of the 77,000 inmates booked into county jail this year were illegal immigrants. Arpaio believes that by keeping pressure on illegal immigrants, he can drive them from Arizona.

"They're heading south, or they're going to California, but they're sure getting out of Arizona," he said.

Blacklisted

D.A. King is a dynamo in Georgia, working tirelessly for tougher immigration enforcement. He's a normal patriot — no Zionist conspiracy hogwash or anything like that — and has been published in the Atlanta paper and elsewhere and been on Fox, CNN, etc. Imagine my surprise, then, when I learned that he's been blacklisted by the Washington Post. And I don't mean that metaphorically.

Better Get That Wall Built

A sobering short piece (from a May issue of Latin America Advisor) by George Grayson, a professor of government at William & Mary and one of the nation's top authorities on Mexico's politics (as well as a CIS board member):

President Felipe Calderón is whistling past the graveyard as the Mexican state continues to disintegrate to the point that the violence to date will pale in comparison to what lies ahead. The government, which has forfeited control over key sectors of society, is hemorrhaging legitimacy.

Verification Follies

As is often the case with immigration, Republicans and Democrats mixed and matched at a House hearing yesterday on E-Verify, the system that enables businesses to determine whether new hires are illegal aliens.

About Time

The president has finally ordered that enrollment in the E-Verify system, which screens new hires for legal status, will be a condition of doing business with the federal government. Interestingly, the president didn't issue a new Executive Order, but instead amended one from 1996, one that originally barred from federal contracts any business fined for the knowing employment of illegals.

The Courts vs. the People

The same day that a federal judge delayed portions of Oklahoma's tough immigration law, Gov. Mark Sanford of South Carolina signed his state's new immigration law, described by the ACLU as "one of the toughest, if not the toughest" measure of its kind. Well, so much for a McCain/Sanford ticket.

This Is Not Your Father's Immigration

A new report from a high-immigration outfit showing, yet again, that many of each year's new "legal" immigrants are actually illegal aliens using the system to launder their status. Nationwide, 42 percent of new legal permanent residents (green-card recipients) in 2003 were former illegal aliens, and in California, the figure was 52 percent. Among the new immigrants from Latin America and the Caribbean, 62 percent were former illegal aliens.

Sovereignty Watch

The U.N. is sending its "Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights of Migrants" to spank Virginia's Prince William County about having the temerity to help enforce immigration laws. It should come as no surprise that the person in question, one Jorge Bustamante, is not only a sociologist but also a lifelong advocate for open borders between the U.S. and Mexico. (He's also the father of Mexico's dual-citizenship law.) He presented a report (Word document) to the U.N. Human Rights Council earlier this year in effect saying the enforcement of U.S. immigration laws was a violation of human rights:

In light of numerous issues described in this report, the Special Rapporteur has come to the conclusion that the United States has failed to adhere to its international obligations to make the human rights of the 37.5 million migrants living in the country (according to Government census data from 2006) a national priority, using a comprehensive and coordinated national policy based on clear international obligations. The primary task of such a national policy should be to recognize that, with the exception of certain rights relating to political participation, migrants enjoy nearly all the same human rights protections as citizens, including an emphasis on meeting the needs of the most vulnerable groups.

But this is tame compared to the language he uses in the Mexican press. In this story and this one from just last month, he compares U.S. immigration enforcement to -- wait for it -- the Nazis. In the second one he says that unless there is an amnesty, "the probabilities are greater each day that xenophobia will triumph in the United States, with the consequent Nazi-style arbitrary detentions and deportations."

The worst part? This interference in our internal affairs only takes place "upon the invitation of the Government" -- our government. Whom do we fire in the State Department for this?

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