Immigration Blog

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Immigration Laws Can Help Fight Terror

How should America handle radical alien Islamists of a jihadi mindset without having to wait until they commit acts of violence, whether as part of a terror cell or as lone jackals? (I refuse to defame wolves.) This question looms large after events in Europe over the past few weeks.

84% of Aliens Admitted in 1st Year of Senate High-Tech Bill Won't Be High-Tech Workers

Congress is about to pass a high-tech foreign worker bill that will — oddly — in its first year, admit something like 430,000 additional temporary workers, about 84 percent of whom will not have high-tech credentials.

That's right — the vast majority of these new nonimmigrant workers will not be admitted because of their technical skills.

Boston University Professor Has Facts Wrong on Immigration

On December 15, Boston University law professor Laila Hlass penned an opinion piece in the Boston Globe titled "Five GOP immigration myths", and unfortunately spread many myths of her own. The immigration issue is undoubtedly complex, but a more accurate picture of President Obama's immigration agenda is important if we are to move toward a better immigration policy.

The Dog that Didn't Bark

In "Silver Blaze" Sherlock Holmes concluded from the fact that a guard dog didn't bark that the dog was friendly with the intruder.

Last night the Republican leadership didn't bark on immigration, because they're friendly with the intruder.

Topics: Politics

Immigration Facets in the President's State of the Union Speech

To the uninitiated, it's hard to tell a real diamond from some of the new synthetic stones: the best of the fakes can even scratch glass as a real diamond would and both shine with rainbow brilliance from all of their facets.

I was reminded of this on Tuesday when the president gave his annual State of the Union address.

There were two things in his speech that caught my attention from an immigration-related perspective, one of them directly and one of them more peripherally, which I'll address first.

Topics: Politics
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