Mexican City Tells Central American Illegals to Keep Moving

A councilwoman in San Juan del Rio, Mexico, recently expressed concern over the growing number of Central American arrivals, particularly those who make their way to and through her municipality.Aidee Mellado Resendiz, a councilwoman for the Humanist Party, warned that the municipality of San Juan de Rio does not have the capacity to accommodate the growing number Central American migrants who illegally migrate to and through Mexico in search of work.
Topics: Mexico

Univision Talks "Potential" Amnesty Under the Trump Administration

Over Memorial Day weekend, Univision anchor Jorge Ramos interviewed the Reverend Samuel Rodriguez, who said he is working with the Trump administration on a proposal to legalize illegal aliens. Rodriguez is one of the few Hispanic leaders to respectfully meet with President Trump. Below is a translated transcript in which Ramos and Rodriguez discuss who would benefit from this proposed amnesty, how the process would function, and the likelihood that the president would approve such measures.

Many Haitians Choosing to Stay in Mexico

As Haitians in the United States receive an extension of their Temporary Protected Status (TPS), those in Mexico have begun to establish themselves in Tijuana and abandon their intentions to cross to the United States. In 2016, the number of Haitian arrivals at the U.S. southwest border swelled. The majority made their way north from Brazil to take advantage of lax immigration enforcement. However, after the Obama administration reinstated Haitian deportations and President Trump took office, the number of Haitians seeking asylum in the United States dropped dramatically.

Reactions to Trump's First 100 Days from South of the Border

The 100th day of the Trump administration arrived over the weekend, and with it an onslaught of articles remarking on the administration's accomplishments, or lack thereof. Below is an overview of immigration-related events and trends that have emerged south of the border, including but not limited to:

Increases in social and economic reintegration programs for deportees; Migrants searching for destinations other than the United States; and A surge of asylum applications in Mexico.

Central Americans Choose Mexico over the United States

The arrival of President Trump at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. appears to be having a deterrent effect on Central Americans. Tabasco Hoy, a Mexican news daily, highlights the story of one of these Central Americans. Per the article, Cinthya Marisol Pereira is a 20-year-old who left Honduras due to "insecurity." Her goal was to reach Mexico and seek asylum there — not in the United States.

Cuban Illegal Aliens Allowed to Stay in Mexico

On Friday, the Mexican government announced it would begin to regularize the status of 588 Cuban illegal aliens in Nuevo Laredo (including a grant of work permits). After the Obama administration ended the "wet foot, dry foot" policy the Cubans passing through Mexico on their way to the U.S. refused to return to the island.
Topics: Cuba, Mexico

As Enforcement Tightens, Hondurans Find Alternative Destinations

As enforcement tightens at the U.S. border and coyotes continue extortion tactics, Honduran migrants are looking to other countries, including Honduras, as final destinations. Sally Valladares, coordinator of the Honduran Observatory of International Migration (OMIH), notes that many Hondurans may not take the risk of crossing the U.S. border, given the current political climate, and will instead stay in Mexico. However, Hondurans are also struggling to make it across Mexico's southern border. As of March, the Honduran Ministry of Foreign Affairs registered the return of 12,566 Hondurans so far this year. Of those registered, 5,771 were deported from the United States and 6,787 from Mexico. Consequently, Valladares expects that Honduran migration to Costa Rica, Canada, and Spain may increase.

Mexico Reforms Education Law to Benefit Deportees

Mexico's President Peña Nieto recently put into effect reforms to the General Education Law primarily to benefit Mexicans deported from the United States. The reforms will make it easier to revalidate education, eliminate bureaucratic barriers, simplify the revalidation of professions, and facilitate the entry of students into the national education system despite a lack of academic or identity documents.
Topics: Education, Mexico

Mexico Reaffirms Commitment to Protect Asylum Seekers

Mexico and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) are working to strengthen their cooperation in international protection, as the United States tightens immigration enforcement and Central Americans continue to make their way north. On Friday, Mexico's Ministry of Foreign Affairs held the first Strategic Dialogue on Protection between the Mexican government and UNHCR. The meeting served as a follow up to commitments announced by President Peña Nieto during the UN Summit for Refugees and Migrants, as well as Mexico's commitments under the San Jose Action Statement.