Immigration Blog

What Now for U.S. v. Texas?

By John Miano, June 24, 2016

The Supreme Court has decided not to decide anything in United States v. Texas. So what happens next?

Now the case progresses normally though the court system. The first stop is that the case will return to the Southern District of Texas. There, the next likely step is that the judge will work with the parties to create a schedule of events to take place. Read more...

Thoughts on the Supreme Court's "Executive Action" Non-Decision

By Dan Cadman, June 24, 2016

As was expected with the death of conservative jurist Antonin Scalia, the remaining eight justices split on the proper course of action when deciding whether to leave in place or overturn lower court decisions on the injunction holding back some of the president's executive actions on immigration. By rules of the Court, the decision leaves intact the injunction, but sends the case back to a U.S. District Court in Texas. Read more...

Canada to Welcome Mexicans with Open Arms

By Kausha Luna, June 24, 2016

Effective December 1, Canada will lift visa restrictions for Mexican travelers, according to reports.

The Globe and Mail, a Canadian newspaper, reported that the move comes with some conditions. The Canadian government wants assurances from Mexico's President Enrique Pena Nieto that Canada will not face a flood of Mexicans claiming refugee status. Read more...

SCOTUS Doesn't Abolish Separation of Powers - Yet

By Mark Krikorian, June 23, 2016

The Supreme Court split 4-4 on the 26-state lawsuit against Obama's amnesty decrees; the full text of the ruling is this: "The judgment is affirmed by an equally divided Court." (No tally was released, but obviously the Democrat justices voted with Obama and the Republicans — even Kennedy — voted against him.)

That means the lower court's decision to uphold the injunction remains in place, and the DAPA amnesty program (for illegal alien parents of U.S.-born kids) and the expansion of the DACA amnesty (for illegals who claim to have come here before age 16) remain on hold. Read more...

The Dangers of Chain Migration, Seen Through the Lens of the Orlando Terrorist Attack

By Dan Cadman, June 23, 2016

Those who kept up with the investigation in the aftermath of the San Bernardino terrorist attack by U.S.-born Syed Rizwan Farook, of Pakistani descent, and his wife, Tashfeen Malik, a Pakistani who entered on a fiancée visa to marry Farook, may have pondered — as I did — whether the two had united in a marriage that they arranged for the purpose of carrying out the attack in the first place. Certainly the indicators were there, including incendiary social network posts that long predated not only the attacks, but Malik's entry into the United States.

There can be many reasons to forge the bonds of marriage, and it is not inconceivable that a shared purpose of jihad is one. Consider the number of young Muslim women who have left comfortable homes and middle-class lives, often in Europe, to become the brides of Islamic State fighters in Syria and Iraq (and perhaps now in some of its other global outposts such as Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, Afghanistan, etc.). Read more...

Sitting on the House Floor

By Dan Cadman, June 23, 2016

I've been watching with a certain amount of disbelief some of the snippets of the Democrats' take-over of the House floor for their gun-control sit-in, replete with photo montages of victims (some number of whom were victims of terrorist attacks, not of deranged killers with no political motive). Read more...

New White House Report on Labor-Force Dropout Is Strangely Confused About Immigration

By Jason Richwine, June 22, 2016

The White House Council of Economic Advisers (CEA) released a new report this week on the long-term decline of work among men ages 25 to 54. Although it contains some interesting insights, the report's specific treatment of immigration is weak and contradictory. Let's start with the CEA's primary explanation for why men have been dropping out of the labor force:

The prime-age male labor force participation rate has been falling in the United States for more than half a century…. No single factor can fully explain this decline, but analysis suggests that a reduction in the demand for less skilled labor has been a key cause of declining participation rates as well as lower wages for less skilled workers. [Emphasis added.]

Visa Overstays: It's Not Just about the Numbers

By Dan Cadman, June 22, 2016

A few days ago, the Washington Post's "Federal Insider" column carried this article by Joe Davidson: "Visa overstays a security risk when 99% of foreigners leave U.S. on time?".

Davidson was keying off of a recent hearing by the House Homeland Security Committee that was examining the national security risk posed by overstays — foreigners who either enter with visas, or via the visa waiver program (VWP), and then overstay their period of authorized admission to blend into the large and amorphous pool of aliens illegally in the United States. Read more...

A Full Page on the Migrant as a Hero – and a Misleading Bit of Journalism

By David North, June 21, 2016

Sunday's Washington Post carried more than a full page of coverage on a woman from Sierra Leone and her retail store — the top half of the Style section's first page was entirely covered by her photo, and there was a substantial amount of text on that page, and then another half page of text and pictures on the second page. Rarely does a previously unknown person get this kind of attention.

It dealt with her store and her adventures with the Department of Homeland Security (which we will get to in a minute), but totally missed what should have been a major element of her story.

The woman, Desiree Venn Frederick, has an extremely rare immigration distinction, which the Post either deliberately ignored or did not know about — though it would be totally visible from the text to the careful reader. Read more...

Feds Move Against Accrediting Council That OK'd Visa Mills

By David North, June 20, 2016

We reported earlier that an accrediting organization recognized by the U.S. Department of Education — one that routinely has given favorable notices to institutions run by visa sharks — has run into trouble and might be put out of business this year. Read more...