Immigration Blog

The Boston Marathon Bombing, Assimilation, and Amnesty

By Jon Feere, April 15, 2014

On the one-year anniversary of the attack on the Boston Marathon, a question that continues to be asked is how two immigrants welcomed into the United States at a relatively young age apparently never assimilated into American culture, and never really accepted the United States as home. On this anniversary, as that question remains unresolved, many members of Congress are working to incorporate illegal aliens into our military. These amnesty advocates have concluded that foreigners who enter the United States by their teenage years are fully American, and consequently not a threat, even though our nation's experience with Boston bombers Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev suggests otherwise. Read more...

Fat Cat H1-B Employers Get Huge USCIS Refunds – Would-Be Citizens Do Not

By David North, April 15, 2014

A low-income alien, wanting to become a citizen, has to scrape up $680 for his naturalization fees. Then he fails the test, twice.

Meanwhile, at the other end of the economic power spectrum, a major fat-cat user of the controversial H-1B program, in order to increase his profits, has applied for more new H-1Bs (at $4,325 apiece) than he can obtain, because of the ceiling on the program. His efforts have failed, in part, too.

So what happens to the poor man's $680? The government keeps it.

What happens to the corporation's fees for those non-approved petitions? The company gets all its money back! Read more...

Immigration Reform in a Republican-Controlled Senate, Pt. 1

By Stanley Renshon, April 15, 2014

Let's image the GOP does gain the six seats necessary to win control of the Senate, and maybe even the few additional seats that Nate Silver thinks possible. Let's further imagine that it then sets out to do the right thing for real immigration reform. What then for immigration reform?

Well, there's good news and bad news. Read more...

Straining the Border, Straining the System, Straining Credibility

By Dan Cadman, April 15, 2014

The New York Times published an article last week entitled "Hoping for Asylum, Migrants Strain U.S. Border". It's worth reading despite its shortcomings.

I don't agree with the apparently blind acceptance of certain assumptions and premises embedded in the article, and I particularly don't care for the notion of journalists accompanying aliens on their smuggling ventures across the U.S. southern border, which may very well have been the case here, based on what I'm seeing in the photos and slide show of the online version.

But mostly, I dislike what the article fails to point out. It does an abysmal job of putting together the pieces of the puzzle in revealing the cause-and-effect between what we are shown – a border out of control – and the administration's policies and practices. I'm wondering why the reporter, Julia Preston, didn't go back to Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Jeh Johnson with some pointed questions after researching this article, and insert his responses so that we could make judgments of our own, rather than relying solely on her prose. Read more...

H1-B Visa Leaves Americans on the Sidelines

By James R. Edwards Jr., April 15, 2014

Two notable economists have highlighted what's making it tougher on middle-aged Americans to land jobs. Irwin Stelzer, writing for the Weekly Standard, and Robert Samuelson, columnist for the Washington Post, show how, despite high unemployment levels for Americans in their 40s, 50s, and 60s, corporate elites would rather import cheap foreign labor to systematically displace these available American workers, who bring tremendous experience, insight, and wisdom to the table. Read more...

Washington Post Muffs Good News on H-1B and Suburban Teachers

By David North, April 14, 2014

There was good news in the Washington Post over the weekend about the declining use of H-1B teachers in a D.C. suburb – but it was hard to tell from reading the paper's story on the subject. Read more...

Republicans on Immigration Reform: A Time for Choosing

By Stanley Renshon, April 14, 2014

Debating and passing immigration reform in the House after the new Congress is seated in January 2015 would by a seismic event for Republicans and their standing with the public.

But first they will have to choose which public they wish to represent.

Choosing correctly is absolutely central to the Republicans' future. In order to do so, however, Republicans will have to understand that they will be addressing several different audiences in any efforts they take toward any real immigration reform efforts:

Rust Belt Salvation through Immigrant Entrepreneurs?

By Dan Cadman, April 14, 2014

Once again a correspondent has emailed to me the link to an article that he suggested I might find interesting. I did, although I didn't agree with much in the article.

What I found even more interesting was the fact that the correspondent who sent the link was the author of the article, Daniel McGraw. It can be found in Belt magazine, which is described in the email as "a new media enterprise targeting the literate middle class"; the web site says it has a "distinctly Rust Belt sensibility". Read more...

A Question about Those 172,500 H-1B Petitions

By David North, April 14, 2014

USCIS has announced that 172,500 petitions have been filed for 85,000 H-1B slots in this hiring season. That's a major increase from the 124,000 filed last year, and the new number is sure to be used by the H-1B employers as they seek still higher ceilings from Congress.

But the news also raises what may be a new question: "To what extent is the number of petitions artificially increased – at little cost to the industry – to game the system?" Read more...

Student, Asylee, Terrorist: The Administration's Immigration Policy Flaws in a Nutshell

By Dan Cadman, April 11, 2014

The FBI announced this week that it had arrested and charged a Moroccan, El Mehdi Semlali Fathi, with lying on his application for asylum (incorrectly referred to as an "application for refugee status" in some media reports). But the underlying cause of the investigation was that Fathi intended to commit acts of terror, according to the Bureau; specifically, that he intended to use a remote-controlled aircraft to bomb a federal building and an unnamed university, as is obvious from the affidavit filed by the FBI case agent.

Other than clearly showing the bugs in the high-gloss finish our administration wants the public to see in its immigration policies, there are a number of troubling things about this case. Read more...