Immigration Blog

What Obama's Immigration Policies Encourage

By Kausha Luna, June 13, 2016

On Wednesday, Telemundo (a Spanish language news network) published an interview with an "unaccompanied minor" abandoned by a coyote.

Ashlyn Bonilla, the Honduran five-year-old, was abandoned in Texas after crossing the border with Mexico. Her mother, Belkis Garcia, paid $4,500 to have her daughter smuggled into the United States. Garcia left her daughter behind in Honduras when Ashlyn was seven months old. Read more...

Emigration Note: The Two-Way Movements of College Students

By David North, June 10, 2016

Those of us who write about migration — from all points of view — tend to focus all our thoughts on immigration. We often tend to forget that migration is a two-way street, with at least some people going in both directions.

To fill that gap there will be, from time to time, these emigration notes on people leaving the country for reasons other than tourism. Today, look at the international movements of college-age people, as they arrive in the United States and as they leave. Read more...

No Stats and No Facts: The Perfect Vacuum for Manipulating Immigration Policies

By Dan Cadman, June 10, 2016

Center for Immigration Studies Executive Director Mark Krikorian has written a piece for National Review Online titled "No Facts, Please — We're Making Immigration Policy" in which he discusses the gaping vacuum that exists where immigration statistics are concerned. His article notes how the lack of verifiable statistics has become one of the tricks by which proponents of various programs, or indeed of large immigration numbers generally, manage to gull the public by making absurd claims that can't be refuted ... because of the absence of those self-same statistics. Read more...

DOL $100 Million Training Grant Plays into H-1B Employers' Bogus Claims

By David North, June 9, 2016

The Department of Labor has announced that it is using $100 million in H-1B fees to train workers so that fewer H-1B workers will be needed (that last verb should be in quotation marks) in the future.

Sounds like good news, right?

Wrong! For two reasons: Read more...

Sheila Jackson Lee's Self-Serving Speculation on Barbara Jordan and Immigration Policy

By Jerry Kammer, June 9, 2016

The Houston Chronicle on Monday published an article about Barbara Jordan, the native of Houston who became a civil rights leader, the first black woman elected to the Texas State Senate, and, in 1972, the first black person elected to Congress from Texas since Reconstruction. At the time of her death in 1996 she was the chairwoman of the U.S. Commission on Immigration Reform.

As the Chronicle noted, the commission "proposed sharp cuts in immigration to protect American workers, a plan some immigration restriction groups still promote in Jordan's name." Read more...

Pro-Amnesty GOP House Member Loses with Less Than 25 Percent of the Vote

By David North, June 8, 2016

In an odd primary contest, a Republican member of the House of Representatives, who had cast an odd vote (for a Republican) in favor of amnesty, lost to another sitting GOP member in North Carolina on Tuesday. So far in this election year, she is the first Republican House member to lose a primary. Read more...

If Obama's Immigration Actions Are Upheld, What's Left of Congress?

By Jon Feere, June 8, 2016

Congress may lose much of its authority over immigration this month.

For decades, the Supreme Court has held that authority over immigration is shared between the political branches — the legislative and the executive. But if the court sides with the Obama administration in United States v. Texas, that balance will forever be upset and Congress will find itself with little recourse. Put another way, if the White House wins, the voters will have greater difficultly shaping immigration policy through congressional elections, and petitioning Congress on immigration will serve little purpose. Read more...

On College Admission, Military Recruitment, and Illegal Aliens

By Dan Cadman, June 8, 2016

Bastion of truth and rectitude Politifact recently assessed a statement by Wisconsin state representative Dale Kooyenga: "Today it is more difficult to enlist in the U.S. military than it is to enroll in college."

The Politifactors rated it "half true", apparently because the phrasing was too categorical for their liking, since, in their words, "There isn't definitive evidence to prove the claim given that it mixes apples and oranges: The military and college are different pursuits with different sets of minimum standards for getting in, and among colleges, the entrance requirements vary widely."

And yet, also in their words, "[T]here are credible estimates saying that roughly 75 percent of young adults in America wouldn't be eligible to enlist if they tried, while roughly two out of three high school graduates go on to a two- or four-year college." So Kooyenga pretty much nailed it. Read more...

Latin America Becoming a Transit Route for Africans and Asians

By Kausha Luna, June 6, 2016

On Saturday, Costa Rica's President Luis Guillermo Solis addressed the leaders of the member countries of the Association of Caribbean States, asking for solidarity and awareness on the migration issues in the region.

The member countries of the Association of Caribbean States (AEC) met in Cuba for its seventh summit. Read more...

F-1 to OPT to H-1B to Green Card-by-Marriage to Murder

By David North, June 6, 2016

One of the irritating aspects of the American press is its routine refusal to report in any detail on the immigration status of prominent criminals.

Take the recent case of Mainak Sarkar, an apparently thin-skinned and mentally unbalanced citizen of India who first killed his estranged wife, a U.S. citizen whose marriage to him made him a green card carrier, and then, a week or so ago, shot the university professor who helped him overcome what sounds like a marginal dissertation to secure his PhD. Subsequently Sarkar killed himself, according to the Associated Press. Read more...