Immigration Blog

Too Much Due Process/Too Few Judges Throughout the Immigration System

By David North, July 23, 2014

The uproar created by the flood of illegals from Central America at the Texas border perhaps can focus our attention on a long-neglected underlying problem – we have too much due process in the immigration system and too few judges (and supporting staff) to handle it.

I am not for eliminating due process in the immigration business, far from it, but there is too much of it generally, and that is accompanied by an unwillingness by the administration to fund the due process it seems to want. Read more...

Enforcement Program Stifled 2001-02 Illegal Central American Flow

By Jessica Vaughan, July 23, 2014

A new Center video interview with Hipolito Acosta, a retired senior U.S. immigration official, describes a successful program in which nearly 80,000 U.S.-bound migrants from Central America were intercepted in Mexico over 12-months in 2001-02. U.S. immigration agents worked with Mexican and Central American governments to repatriate the migrants and arrest smugglers. As a result, U.S. Border Patrol apprehensions of illegal crossers from Central America were reduced by 76 percent over the period. The program cost $1.6 million – but saved the U.S. government hundreds of millions of dollars in enforcement spending by preventing the illegal crossings from occurring. The Department of Homeland Security should adopt a similar program aimed at prevention and deterrence to address the current surge of illegal families and children. Read more...

Sen. Cornyn Reacts to Criticism of the HUMANE Act Bill Pending in Congress

By Dan Cadman, July 23, 2014

On July 21, National Review Online (NRO) published an article by Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas), responding to criticism of the Helping Unaccompanied Minors and Alleviating National Emergency (HUMANE) Act by both the left and the right. (The HUMANE Act was filed jointly in both houses of Congress; in the Senate by Cornyn and in the House of Representatives by Rep. Henry Cuellar (D-Texas)). Read more...

How the Feds Stopped the Illegal Brazilian Influx of 2005

By Jerry Kammer, July 23, 2014

Americans have been stunned by report of the chaotic movement of tens of thousands of Central Americans across the Rio Grande. Instead of law and policies that discourage illegal immigration by arresting and deporting unauthorized border crossers, the public has learned of a system that encourages the massive influx by providing illegal crossers with permission to join family members or friends across the country. The system has turned the Border Patrol, long regarded as a formidable border barrier, into a Welcome Wagon.

The story is bizarre. But it is not unprecedented. As Congress surveys the chaotic border landscape and considers a legislative fix, it could learn a great deal from a similar situation that developed in the same part of the Texas border just nine years ago. Read more...

The Border Surge Is Much More than a Humanitarian Issue

By Stanley Renshon, July 22, 2014

The president's framing of the unprecedented surge of illegal aliens turning themselves into border officials in the expectation of being allowed to stay in the United States, as an "urgent humanitarian situation", is only partially correct. The phase is designed to misdirect public attention away from the more damming truths of the surge; it is equally, if not more so, a crisis of enforcement, governing, and the president's responsibility carry out his oath of office. It is an ethical issue for the public as well as the president.

None of these considerations are captured or even suggested by the administration's preferred phasing. Nor are they meant to do so. Read more...

A Very Personal Argument for More Interior Immigration Enforcement

By David North, July 22, 2014

Sometimes we get phone calls here at the Center from distressed citizens in conflict with illegal aliens — and they add a strong, personal dimension to the arguments about the lack of interior enforcement of immigration law.

Here's one such story, with all names deleted. Read more...

Honduran Paper: Young People, Fleeing Neglected Schools, Head for U.S.

By Jerry Kammer, July 22, 2014

The Honduran newspaper El Heraldo has just published a story about schools so badly neglected by the Honduran government that they are increasingly abandoned by young people, who then choose to go to the United States: Read more...

What If They WERE Refugees?

By Mark Krikorian, July 22, 2014

The party line of the anti-borders Left regarding the "unaccompanied" minors surging across the border into South Texas is that they're "refugees" fleeing violence and persecution, like Syrians in Turkey or Somalis in Kenya. (This description is extended to the rest of the flow, as well, since the ostensibly unaccompanied make up well under half of the surge.) This is why they describe it as primarily a humanitarian issue not amenable to a law-enforcement response.

While Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador are indeed unsavory places, there's no honest disputing at this point that the flow was generated by Obama's five-year record of gutting immigration law. But let's take the anti-borders crowd at its word and accept for the sake of argument that the Central Americans represent a refugee flow.

They still should be turned away. Read more...

Mixed Messages on Abusing the H-2A and H-2B Migrant Worker Programs

By David North, July 22, 2014

Mixed messages come to us from rural North Carolina about the abuse of two temporary foreign worker programs: H-2A, for farm workers, and H-2B, for non-skilled, non-farm workers.

The messages are:

  1. The Department of Labor occasionally zaps the suspect middlemen in these programs, as it did commendably in this case, and

  2. These middlemen have numerous opportunities to beat the system, exploit alien workers, and displace resident workers. The numbers and range of illegalities in this case are so great that it took the federal grand jury 57 tightly written pages to list and describe all of the violations.

Salvadoran Smuggler Disputes Story of Thousands of Children Traveling Solo: "They don't go. They are taken."

By Jerry Kammer, July 21, 2014

Along the east Texas border, in towns like Brownsville, children – including very young children – are coming out of the Mexico desert, alone. They've fled their towns and cities in Central America. Alone, they've run a gauntlet across Mexico, of bandits, corrupt police, and drug gangs. Robbed, beaten, sometimes raped, kidnapped. They're the ones who survived. Others died on the way. At least 60,000 are expected this year. ... Can you imagine being 8, 10, 14 years old, fleeing your home town – Tegucigalpa, Guatemala City, San Salvador – and traveling alone on top of a train across Mexico?

— Tom Ashbrook, introducing the June 9 edition of his program "On Point", broadcast on public radio stations across the country. Read more...