Immigration Blog

Using Expatriating Acts Against Terrorists to Safeguard the Homeland

By Dan Cadman, May 18, 2016

Twice in recent days I've blogged about a remarkable Department of Justice (DOJ) manuscript documenting the foundation and work of DOJ's Office of Special Investigations (OSI) — see here and here.

DOJ buried the manuscript for several years under cover of confidentiality, and finally released a redacted version only to have the unexpurgated document leaked to the New York Times. I'm not generally a fan of the Times' editorial views — too liberal-progressive for my taste, especially in matters of immigration policy — but, like the Washington Post, perhaps simply by virtue of place and circumstance they sometimes perform a public service by publishing suppressed documents of national interest when aided by angry whistleblowers and scorned bureaucrats (the Pentagon Papers and Watergate come quickly to mind). Read more...

EB-5 Funds Created Jobs, but Workers Were Not Paid

By David North, May 17, 2016

Here's a new wrinkle in the EB-5 business: An employer got millions in EB-5 funds to run a shrimp farm and then didn't pay its workers.

Does the business get credit for creating these jobs without paychecks? Do the investors get their green cards anyway? As you might imagine, answers are not readily available.

Florida Organic Aquaculture, a for-profit enterprise, is a 22-acre shrimp farm in Fellsmere, Fla., and is reported by one news account to be a $16 million project that involved an unstated, but apparently substantial, amount of EB-5 investments. Read more...

F.H. Buckley: Canada Is a More Successful Melting Pot than the U.S.

By Jerry Kammer, May 17, 2016

Yesterday's post reported on the appearance last week of George Mason law professor F.H. Buckley on MSNBC's Morning Joe program. Today we have more thoughts from the professor, who holds both U.S. and Canadian citizenship and says Canada has a better system of legal immigration than the United States because Canada, he notes, prioritizes the selection of immigrants who have skills and educational achievement that will allow them to integrate into the country's cultural and economic life. The U.S. system for awarding green cards, meanwhile, is heavily weighted toward family unification, i.e., allowing migrants who are already here to bring over their relatives, without regard to skill. Read more...

"Schrodinger's Immigrant" Is No Paradox: Welfare and Work Go Together in Today's America

By Jason Richwine, May 17, 2016

Immigration skeptics need to get their stories straight, according to a misleading internet meme that has been going around the past couple of years. Immigrants either compete with natives for jobs, or they go on welfare. It can't be both, right? That's the point of the graphic below, which is a play on the famous Schrodinger's Cat paradox. "Too lazy to work" is presumably a reference to concerns about immigrants using welfare, which other iterations have made explicit. Read more...

This Is Getting Monotonous – Third Indian-on-Indian H-1B Scandal in 12 Days

By David North, May 16, 2016

This is getting monotonous. On May 4 we reported a middle-sized case of H-1B fraud involving both the loss of jobs to U.S. residents and the exploitation of Indian workers by Indian criminal employers in Virginia.

On May 12 we wrote about a somewhat similar case in California, and today we have the third case in the set, this time in Memphis, Tenn. Three cases in 12 days, all in the federal courts.

This time the corrupt employer, Ramesh Basa, has pled out and has agreed that the feds can seize six pieces of his real estate valued at half a million dollars as part of the deal. The agreement also included a joint recommendation by attorneys on both sides of the case for a one-year jail term for Basa. Read more...

Temporary Protected Status Means Never Having to Go Home

By Mark Krikorian, May 16, 2016

Congress in 1990 created something called Temporary Protected Status in an attempt to hem in unilateral executive actions on immigration. The law created a framework for presidents to let illegal aliens from a country stay here for a limited period of time if there was a natural disaster or civil violence back home that made the country "unable, temporarily, to adequately handle the return of its nationals." The point was to prevent presidential freelancing, though what had happened up to that time was microscopic compared to Obama's outrages. (I wrote last month about the likely grant of TPS to Ecuadorian illegals in the wake of the earthquake there.) Read more...

U.S. Immigration Policy Imports Immobility and Boosts American Aristocracy, New Book Says

By Jerry Kammer, May 16, 2016

As we at CIS prepare for our annual week-long border trip, which this year takes us to the Canadian border with New York and Vermont, I have been reading up on our northern neighbor's approach to border management and immigration policy. So my ears perked up last week when a native of Canada who studies immigration policy was a guest on the Morning Joe program. Read more...

"Make America Mexico Again"

By Dan Cadman, May 16, 2016

A number of observers have commented on the proliferation of Mexican flags at rallies in favor of amnesty and open borders, as well as at anti-Trump demonstrations. They've also noticed the "Make America Mexico Again" slogan showing up on signs, hats, and hashtags — supposedly as a humorous meme, but almost certainly one that exhibits more than a grain of serious intent behind it, even though such an intent would be ironic in the extreme. Read more...

OPT Case Headed Back to District Court

By John Miano, May 16, 2016

The latest in the 8-year-old legal saga of Optional Practical Training (OPT) is that the D.C. Circuit Court has dismissed the case. This is not as ominous as it might sound. The effect is that the case goes back to the lower court, the D.C. District. Read more...

It Ain't Over 'til the Alien Wins

By Mark Krikorian, May 15, 2016

"Immigration cases — like old soldiers — seem never to die."

That's the opening line of the First Circuit Court of Appeals ruling in a recent case that exemplifies the relentless war on America's borders being waged by immigration lawyers and their illegal-alien clients.

This is an utterly conventional case, like thousands of others that clog the courts, the result of "serial attempts to revisit a final order of removal" (a deportation order), in the words of the ruling. The alien plaintiff's 20-year campaign of lies and immigration fraud shows what our immigration-enforcement system is up against. Read more...