Immigration Blog

Shouldn't the Public Know When ICE Releases Criminal Aliens? Georgia Bill Says 'Yes'

By Mark Krikorian, March 14, 2017

John Fonte noted at the National Review site last week that the new DHS office serving victims of criminal aliens (dubbed VOICE) will help challenge the dominant media narrative about immigration. Along with the complementary initiative to systematically provide the public with information on crimes committed by released criminal aliens, Fonte says it represents "the opening round of a long-overdue declaration of (political) war on the sanctuary cities, counties, and states that protect criminal aliens." Read more...

ProPublica's Faulty Look at the Value of Border Searches

By Dan Cadman, March 14, 2017

ProPublica, which bills itself as "journalism in the public interest", recently published a piece by Patrick Lee, "Can Customs and Border Officials Search Your Phone? These Are Your Rights".

The article goes much farther than just phones, and digs generally into border authorities, including stops and searches. But I found it hard to actually get that far, because I myself was stopped — floored, in fact — by the very first paragraph: Read more...

Team USA Faces Hostile "Home" Crowd in Miami at the World Baseball Classic

By David Seminara, March 14, 2017

Team USA played the Dominican Republic in the World Baseball Classic on Saturday night in what was officially considered a "home" game. But the game, won by the Dominican Republic 7-5 was played in Miami, a city that must feel very foreign to American teams facing opponents from Latin American countries. Baseball analyst Ken Rosenthal neatly summarized the overwhelmingly pro-Dominican crowd in Miami in a dispatch with the dateline, "SANTO DOMINGO NORTH". Read more...

Mexico Reaffirms Commitment to Protect Asylum Seekers

By Kausha Luna, March 14, 2017

Mexico and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) are working to strengthen their cooperation in international protection, as the United States tightens immigration enforcement and Central Americans continue to make their way north.

On Friday, Mexico's Ministry of Foreign Affairs held the first Strategic Dialogue on Protection between the Mexican government and UNHCR. The meeting served as a follow up to commitments announced by President Peña Nieto during the UN Summit for Refugees and Migrants, as well as Mexico's commitments under the San Jose Action Statement. Read more...

Foreign Worker Visa Fees Shouldn't Subsidize Labor Market Abuse

By David North, March 14, 2017

One of the management tools potentially available to the government in the immigration field is the size of the fees that it charges for adjudicating employer petitions.

At the very least, the size of the fees should meet the standards of the law (31 USC 9701), which I discuss below, and should not encourage the overuse of foreign workers to the detriment of resident workers. The past administration did not accept the second concept at all, but perhaps the new one will. Read more...

Don't Blame the Art History Majors for the Tech Community's Addiction to Guest Workers

By David Seminara, March 13, 2017

A piece in USA Today last week about the explosive growth of students earning women's and gender studies degrees had me thinking about how the degrees American students obtain impact the immigration debate. The article states that, according to the National Center for Education Statistics, the number of women's and gender studies degrees in the United States has soared by more than 300 percent since 1990, with more than 2,000 degrees conferred in 2015 alone. Read more...

Judicial Overreach 2.0: Here We Go Again

By Dan Cadman, March 13, 2017

On March 6, President Trump issued his much-awaited revised version of the executive order (EO) "Protecting The Nation From Foreign Terrorist Entry Into The United States", ("Travel Ban 2.0" as Center for Immigration Studies Executive Director Mark Krikorian has described it).

The first iteration hit a legal wall at the federal Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, which upheld a "temporary" restraining order of indefinite duration issued by a U.S. District Court judge in Washington State. Neither the district nor appellate court orders were models of judicial probity. (See the series of four different authors' entries on the Center's home page, bundled under "Ninth Circuit Overreach" for many of the objections to the courts' collective decisions.) Read more...

Central Americans Turn to Mexico for Asylum

By Kausha Luna, March 10, 2017

As the Trump administration tightens immigration enforcement, Central Americans are increasingly opting to apply for refugee status in Mexico.

A Spanish language article highlights the experiences of a Salvadoran man and Honduran woman who travelled to Mexico with the intention to cross the border into the United States. In their narratives, the Central Americans explained that after President Trump's election they, like many others, chose to instead stay in Mexico and apply for refugee status. Both of their cases are among those that were rejected, due to the inability to prove that they meet the criteria for refugee status. Read more...

Prosecuting Immigration Crimes in the Interior

By Dan Cadman, March 10, 2017

My colleague Joseph Kolb has written a valuable blog post on how important it is to use prosecution of immigration crimes as one tool in the arsenal to combat illegal immigration to the United States.

In his post, he discusses the Border Patrol's "consequence delivery system" (CDS) — a mapped-out table of ways to ensure that illegal immigration at the border is met with timely and appropriate consequences, one of which is to promptly prosecute offenders. Read more...

DACA: Granting Amnesty to Dreamers Committing Crimes While Abandoning Their Victims

By Ronald W. Mortensen, March 10, 2017

The Obama administration's Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program provides amnesty from serious job-related felonies and other crimes committed by DACA-eligible illegal aliens (often called Dreamers) and their employers while providing no assistance to the American citizen victims of their crimes.

Under President Trump's executive order on immigration enforcement, many Dreamers currently protected by or eligible for DACA would be eligible for deportation because of the crimes that they have committed or are committing. In addition, President Trump's Victims of Immigration Crime Engagement office (VOICE) will help the victims of illegal alien crimes by facilitating "engagement with the victims and their families to ensure, to the extent permitted by law, that they are provided information about the offender, including the offender's immigration status and custody status, and that their questions and concerns regarding immigration enforcement efforts are addressed." Read more...