Immigration Blog

Illegal Alien Crime Deniers: Wall Street Journal

By Ronald W. Mortensen, March 18, 2017

In a March 12 editorial, the Wall Street Journal solidified its place among the nation's top illegal alien crime deniers by taking exception to President Trump's efforts to focus attention on crimes committed by illegal aliens. In fact, according to the Journal, "there's no evidence that immigrants commit more crimes than do native-born citizens and some suggest they commit less."

In addition, the Journal opined that "the federal government doesn't need a new bureaucracy given the facts about immigrant crime." In other words, according to the Wall Street Journal, there is no need for a Victims of Immigration Crime Engagement (VOICE) Office to act as a liaison with "known victims of crimes committed by removable aliens" since illegal alien crime is not a problem and the Americans who are victimized by illegal aliens can get along just fine on their own. Read more...

EB-5 Takes Two (Unpublicized) Body Blows with Bi-Coastal Overtones

By David North, March 17, 2017

The EB-5 (immigrant investor) program took two body blows, neither well publicized, earlier this week, after taking a drubbing in a House Judiciary Committee hearing last week.

This week's reverses both had bi-coastal angles. In the first, yet another EB-5 fraud case emerged in the state of Washington; it was announced (and denounced) by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). Read more...

The New Republic? Is That Still Around?

By Mark Krikorian, March 14, 2017

The New Republic, a century-old liberal magazine, basically ceased to exist when most of its staff and writers resigned in 2014 in response to mismanagement by owner Chris Hughes, co-founder of Facebook. He sold the shell of the magazine last year to a lefty activist and publisher from Oregon, and what's now called TNR seems to be just another Salon. Read more...

Shouldn't the Public Know When ICE Releases Criminal Aliens? Georgia Bill Says 'Yes'

By Mark Krikorian, March 14, 2017

John Fonte noted at the National Review site last week that the new DHS office serving victims of criminal aliens (dubbed VOICE) will help challenge the dominant media narrative about immigration. Along with the complementary initiative to systematically provide the public with information on crimes committed by released criminal aliens, Fonte says it represents "the opening round of a long-overdue declaration of (political) war on the sanctuary cities, counties, and states that protect criminal aliens." Read more...

ProPublica's Faulty Look at the Value of Border Searches

By Dan Cadman, March 14, 2017

ProPublica, which bills itself as "journalism in the public interest", recently published a piece by Patrick Lee, "Can Customs and Border Officials Search Your Phone? These Are Your Rights".

The article goes much farther than just phones, and digs generally into border authorities, including stops and searches. But I found it hard to actually get that far, because I myself was stopped — floored, in fact — by the very first paragraph: Read more...

Team USA Faces Hostile "Home" Crowd in Miami at the World Baseball Classic

By David Seminara, March 14, 2017

Team USA played the Dominican Republic in the World Baseball Classic on Saturday night in what was officially considered a "home" game. But the game, won by the Dominican Republic 7-5 was played in Miami, a city that must feel very foreign to American teams facing opponents from Latin American countries. Baseball analyst Ken Rosenthal neatly summarized the overwhelmingly pro-Dominican crowd in Miami in a dispatch with the dateline, "SANTO DOMINGO NORTH". Read more...

Mexico Reaffirms Commitment to Protect Asylum Seekers

By Kausha Luna, March 14, 2017

Mexico and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) are working to strengthen their cooperation in international protection, as the United States tightens immigration enforcement and Central Americans continue to make their way north.

On Friday, Mexico's Ministry of Foreign Affairs held the first Strategic Dialogue on Protection between the Mexican government and UNHCR. The meeting served as a follow up to commitments announced by President Peña Nieto during the UN Summit for Refugees and Migrants, as well as Mexico's commitments under the San Jose Action Statement. Read more...

Foreign Worker Visa Fees Shouldn't Subsidize Labor Market Abuse

By David North, March 14, 2017

One of the management tools potentially available to the government in the immigration field is the size of the fees that it charges for adjudicating employer petitions.

At the very least, the size of the fees should meet the standards of the law (31 USC 9701), which I discuss below, and should not encourage the overuse of foreign workers to the detriment of resident workers. The past administration did not accept the second concept at all, but perhaps the new one will. Read more...

Don't Blame the Art History Majors for the Tech Community's Addiction to Guest Workers

By David Seminara, March 13, 2017

A piece in USA Today last week about the explosive growth of students earning women's and gender studies degrees had me thinking about how the degrees American students obtain impact the immigration debate. The article states that, according to the National Center for Education Statistics, the number of women's and gender studies degrees in the United States has soared by more than 300 percent since 1990, with more than 2,000 degrees conferred in 2015 alone. Read more...

Judicial Overreach 2.0: Here We Go Again

By Dan Cadman, March 13, 2017

On March 6, President Trump issued his much-awaited revised version of the executive order (EO) "Protecting The Nation From Foreign Terrorist Entry Into The United States", ("Travel Ban 2.0" as Center for Immigration Studies Executive Director Mark Krikorian has described it).

The first iteration hit a legal wall at the federal Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, which upheld a "temporary" restraining order of indefinite duration issued by a U.S. District Court judge in Washington State. Neither the district nor appellate court orders were models of judicial probity. (See the series of four different authors' entries on the Center's home page, bundled under "Ninth Circuit Overreach" for many of the objections to the courts' collective decisions.) Read more...