Stanley Renshon's blog

The Myth of Economic Cost-Free Immigration, Pt. 2

By Stanley Renshon, July 7, 2014

The hope that more and more immigration will solve America's economic problems is doomed to disappoint those who tout it and those who believe that is possible. It may add dollars to our GNP, but it comes with substantial costs, both economic and political.

It is simply untrue that there are enormous numbers of Steve Jobs out there waiting to get their green cards. Jobs was quite unique in many ways. Read more...

The Myth of Economic Cost-Free Immigration, Pt. 1

By Stanley Renshon, July 4, 2014

A lie is usually defined as a willful misrepresentation made with the intent to deceive. Read more...

Avoiding GOP Immigration Reform Self-Sabotage, Pt. 9: The Lure of $$$

By Stanley Renshon, June 30, 2014

If there's one thing that Democrats, Beltway Republicans, and their supporters agree on it is that immigration is good for America's bottom line.

Larry Kudlow makes that case in National Review as follows: "The dynamic idea is that immigration significantly increases the size of the U.S. labor force, and that more workers mean more growth." Read more...

Avoiding GOP Immigration Reform Self-Sabotage, Pt. 8: The Gateway Issue Redux

By Stanley Renshon, June 10, 2014

There may be some truth to Jeb Bush's view that immigration is a "gateway issue for Hispanics". He is quoted as saying, "If you can get past that, then you have to make a case on a broader set of issues." This point was seconded in a Sunday news show appearance by Matthew Dowd, chief strategist for the Bush-Cheney 2004 presidential campaign, "The problem for Republicans is that immigration reform is a gateway issue and basically says you have to do something about that in order for those voters to listen to you on all those other issues."

The question is: What is that "something" you "have to do"? Read more...

Avoiding GOP Immigration Reform Self-Sabotage, Pt. 7: The Gateway Issue

By Stanley Renshon, June 3, 2014

Even those Republicans interested in real immigration reform who are not panicked by wild, non-contextualized Democratic analysis face a difficult question: What difference will it make to Republican attempts to woo Hispanics?

Answers range from not much to possibly some.

This is the so-called "gateway" question and it asks: Can the GOP successfully get Hispanics to listen to, and support, their policy pitches if they don't first pass immigration legislation? Read more...

Avoiding GOP Immigration Reform Self-Sabotage, Pt. 6: Fellow Republicans

By Stanley Renshon, June 2, 2014

Of all the groups and ideas that are most dangerous to real immigration reform, there is none in a better position to do terrible damage than Republicans themselves. And among Republicans there are no groups or leaders more poised at the precipice of a historic mistake than those who are panicked by demographic projections or those who want some concrete marker to demonstrate their policy empathy with Hispanics by signing on to the massive changes in immigration numbers and procedures contained in the Democratic Party's legislation. Read more...

Avoiding GOP Immigration Reform Self-Sabotage, Pt. 5: High-Tech Visas

By Stanley Renshon, May 28, 2014

It is doubtlessly naïve to expect, or get, some degree of basic substantive honesty in the immigration debate from those whose who are wholly taken up with their organization or group's self interest. Still, it would be refreshing if groups like the U.S. Chamber of Commerce at least acknowledged that their circumstances really are not as dire as their rhetoric. Read more...

Avoiding GOP Immigration Reform Self-Sabotage, Pt. 4: The Chamber of Commerce

By Stanley Renshon, May 27, 2014

It's hard to think of a more important member of the Republican establishment than the Chamber of Commerce. The very name conjures up Republican cultural values and economic goals — business, the free enterprise system, industriousness, delay of gratification, risk taking, resilience — even profit and economic mobility. Read more...

Avoiding GOP Immigration Reform Self-Sabotage, Pt. 3: "Conservatives for Comprehensive Immigration Reform"

By Stanley Renshon, May 23, 2014

The Republican establishment, as it might be called, consists of its "professional class" — past and present political office holders, consultants, pundits, heads of various Republican constituency groups, and associated think tanks and personnel. Collectively, they might be considered the Republican Washington establishment (even if not all its members are physically in the capital). They are, generally, in favor of immigration reform, and have endorsed Republican support for the 2013 Senate Democratic bill, some vociferously. Read more...

Avoiding GOP Immigration Self-Sabotage, Pt. 2: Tea Party vs. Establishment

By Stanley Renshon, May 21, 2014

One of the most basic forms of self-sabotage is unnecessary warfare among parties that essentially agree with each other. However, another form of self-sabotage is denying that important differences exist among like-minded parties and not clarifying them so the differences can receive a fair hearing. Read more...

Avoiding GOP Immigration Reform Self-Sabotage, Pt. 1: The Primaries Trap!

By Stanley Renshon, May 20, 2014

Rushing to pass a Republican immigration bill in the House before August makes no policy or political sense for a number of reasons. There is little time left to reach agreement among Republicans. The congressional elections are only four months away and Republicans will be a much better position to pass real immigration reform should they win majorities in both the House and the Senate. And even if they fail to win the Senate, delaying an immigration bill until after the new House convenes in January 2015 means that the 2013 Senate Democratic bill is essentially dead and is very unlikely to be revived in its present form. Read more...

A Republican Immigration Reform Bill: The Politics of Timing, Pt. 2

By Stanley Renshon, May 19, 2014

Republicans have three basic choices regarding an immigration reform bill; they can support the Democrat's Senate (and House) bill, do nothing, or forge their own.

The most obvious best choice for Republicans is to write their own bill. But when?

The choices are these: Read more...

A Republican Immigration Reform Bill: The Politics of Timing, Pt. 1

By Stanley Renshon, May 16, 2014

If Republicans gain control of the Senate, they will have a great many important agenda items to consider, and not much time to do something about them. The 114th Congress, elected in November 2014 will officially be in session from January 3, 2015, to January 3, 2017. Read more...

Passing Immigration Reform: Republican and Democratic Dilemmas, Pt. 2

By Stanley Renshon, May 15, 2014

If Republicans in the Senate or the House pass immigration bills, Democrats will be in a tough spot. They could, and many would be tempted, to turn away from a Republican bill because: Read more...

Passing Immigration Reform: Republican and Democratic Dilemmas, Pt. 1

By Stanley Renshon, May 13, 2014

The president may well be suffering the pangs of a legacy hunger, but Republicans won't be able to help him satisfy it with real immigration reform if they don't act. And, the immigration clock is ticking whether the Republicans act or not. Read more...

The House-Senate Conference Committee Dilemma, Pt. 2

By Stanley Renshon, May 12, 2014

There are no formal rules that outline how House-Senate conference meetings are required to be organized. However, the procedures that have developed over time are quite complex.

What follows here are some general considerations, with their major implications for passing a real immigration reform bill. Read more...

The House-Senate Conference Committee Dilemma, Pt. 1

By Stanley Renshon, May 9, 2014

The chances of a Republican Senate as a result of the 2014 congressional elections are increasing. One respected academic analyst puts the chances at 82 percent! As a result, pundits and commentators are beginning to pay attention to the possible implications of that possible switch, of which there are many. Read more...

Immigration Reform in a Republican Controlled Senate, Pt. 8

By Stanley Renshon, May 1, 2014

Perhaps the most basic reason why it is important for a Republican Senate majority to pass their version of an immigration reform bill is contained in the following sentence from an article in the Washington Post describing House Speaker John Boehner's message on immigration: "That the House may one day act independently of the Senate but won't seriously engage on the subject until his colleagues reach a level of trust with Obama, who they say has openly disregarded federal law in an attempt to advance his political agenda."

The key part of that sentence is the reference to "the House acting independently of the Senate". Read more...

Immigration Reform in a Republican Controlled Senate, Pt. 7

By Stanley Renshon, April 28, 2014

Why would 13 Republican senators who voted for the massive, complex, and largely unread Senate immigration bill in 2013 vote for a much more focused set of immigration bills covering enforcement, followed by selective legalization for those qualified, and recasting the balance between more circumscribed family unification and increased opportunities for higher skilled and educated immigrants? Read more...

Immigration Reform in a Republican-Controlled Senate, Pt. 6

By Stanley Renshon, April 25, 2014

Republican leaders have, understandably, not gone very far in publicly discussing their possible agenda if they win control of both the House and the Senate in the November elections. One thing is clear so far, however, and that is that immigration reform is not at the top of their list.

This is, in some ways, understandable. Tax and entitlement reform are large, important issues for Republican supporters, as is substantial modification or replacement of the president's heath care law. Read more...

Immigration Reform in a Republican-Controlled Senate, Pt. 5

By Stanley Renshon, April 23, 2014

The best path to real immigration reform in a 2015 Senate narrowly controlled by Republicans -- as many as 13 of whose likely GOP members voted for the Democratic immigration bill in 2013 -- is through the chairman of the Judiciary Committee.

The chairman can set the direction of the committee and frame the specific issues it will address and hold hearings on, but he can do much more. He can choose which immigration bill will be brought before the committee for debate and markup. Read more...

Immigration Reform in a Republican-Controlled Senate, Pt. 4

By Stanley Renshon, April 21, 2014

Any realistic numbers by which Republicans would gain control of the Senate would still leave the relative weight of the parties rather close to each other. That means that getting Republican legislation passed, including immigration legislation, will not be easy. That includes real immigration reform. Read more...

Immigration Reform in a Republican-Controlled Senate, Pt. 3

By Stanley Renshon, April 21, 2014

Life and politics rarely proceed in a straight line. And that goes for the possibility of real immigration reform in a Republican-controlled Senate.

The actual numbers of Republican Senators, new and old, who would support real immigration reform, as opposed to a 2015 clone of the Democrats' 2013 effort, is a question mark. Read more...

Immigration Reform in a Republican-Controlled Senate, Pt. 2

By Stanley Renshon, April 16, 2014

The numbers count of any likely GOP Senate majority in the new Congress suggests that real immigration reform is by no means a forgone conclusion. Indeed, it could be rather iffy.

The ratio of Democrats to Republicans is important, as is control of the Senate. And the actual composition of the crucial Senate committees matters as well, and that certainly includes the Senate Judiciary that has primary (but shared) jurisdiction over immigration legislation. Read more...

Immigration Reform in a Republican-Controlled Senate, Pt. 1

By Stanley Renshon, April 15, 2014

Let's image the GOP does gain the six seats necessary to win control of the Senate, and maybe even the few additional seats that Nate Silver thinks possible. Let's further imagine that it then sets out to do the right thing for real immigration reform. What then for immigration reform?

Well, there's good news and bad news. Read more...

Republicans on Immigration Reform: A Time for Choosing

By Stanley Renshon, April 14, 2014

Debating and passing immigration reform in the House after the new Congress is seated in January 2015 would by a seismic event for Republicans and their standing with the public.

But first they will have to choose which public they wish to represent.

Choosing correctly is absolutely central to the Republicans' future. In order to do so, however, Republicans will have to understand that they will be addressing several different audiences in any efforts they take toward any real immigration reform efforts:

Needed: A New Immigration Debate Narrative

By Stanley Renshon, April 11, 2014

House Republicans should step forward immediately after the new Congress is seated to debate and pass real immigration reform. In doing so they not only stand a real chance of having their reforms enacted, especially if the Republicans gain a majority in the Senate, but of also changing the terms of debate.

That new immigration debate is coming, unless Republicans do nothing and allow the old immigration debate to have a new, undeserved lease on life. Read more...

Why Passing House Immigration Bills in the Next Congress Matters, Pt. 4

By Stanley Renshon, April 9, 2014

The period between the 2014 congressional election and the 2016 presidential election is an essential period when Republicans should act on real immigration reform. The passage of real reform legislation by the House, or if possible by the House and (Republican) Senate, would establish that Republicans are serious, reform-minded, and in touch with the repeatedly expressed wishes and concerns of the American public. Read more...

Why Passing House Immigration Bills in the Next Congress Matters, Pt. 3

By Stanley Renshon, April 4, 2014

The latest twist in the Democratic attempt to muscle and scare House Republicans into passing a Senate-like version of their immigration bill is to claim that, according to the Washington Post's Greg Sargent, passing a bill after the November election "will be significantly harder than it is now." (Emphasis in original.) Read more...

Why Passing House Immigration Bills in the Next Congress Matters, Pt. 2

By Stanley Renshon, April 2, 2014

The official spokesman for Democratic Party position, Washington Post pundit Greg Sargent, is worried that House Republicans won't, or alternatively will, pass immigration legislation in the next Congress after the November elections. Actually, he is really more worried about the latter.

Mr. Sargent is certain that the "extremely inadequate" Republican immigrant bill or bills that he refers to — enforcement and citizenship for DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) applicants — won't "fix the GOP's Latino Problem". Actually he is worried that it will to a substantial degree, and it might. Read more...