Central Americans Turn to Mexico for Asylum

As the Trump administration tightens immigration enforcement, Central Americans are increasingly opting to apply for refugee status in Mexico. A Spanish language article highlights the experiences of a Salvadoran man and Honduran woman who travelled to Mexico with the intention to cross the border into the United States. In their narratives, the Central Americans explained that after President Trump's election they, like many others, chose to instead stay in Mexico and apply for refugee status. Both of their cases are among those that were rejected, due to the inability to prove that they meet the criteria for refugee status.

Mexican Government Prepares Its Illegals in the U.S. for Detention

More than a decade after publishing a comic book showing how to sneak into the United States, Mexico's Ministry of Foreign Affairs has created an infographic video to advise Mexican illegal aliens in the United States how to prepare for possible detention by immigration authorities. Titled "Recommendations in Case of Immigration Detention", the video outlines seven steps to be taken. These recommendations are divided into two sections.
Topics: Mexico

Tillerson and Kelly Visit Mexico, Discuss Migration

After DHS Secretary John Kelly visited Guatemala on Wednesday, he joined Secretary of State Rex Tillerson in Mexico. There, the U.S. officials met with their counterparts and with Mexican President Peña Nieto to discuss bilateral relations, including migration issues. This visit was highly anticipated, in light of Mexico's opposition to President Trump's restoration of immigration enforcement.After a meeting on Thursday morning, Tillerson and Kelly joined Mexico's Foreign Minister Luis Videgaray and Secretary of the Interior Miguel Angel Osorio Chong for a press briefing.
Topics: Mexico

Mexico Responds to DHS Memos

On Wednesday, Mexico's Minister of Foreign Affairs Luis Videgaray Caso answered a series of questions from the press relating to the implementation memos recently published by the United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS). One question was of particular interest: "What will Mexico do specifically, in addition to appealing to international organizations, to prevent the United States from deporting non-Mexican citizens to Mexico? What will [the government] do to keep Central Americans from coming on deportation planes, for example?"
Topics: Mexico

DHS Secretary Kelly Meets with Guatemalan President

On Wednesday, Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly visited Guatemala to discuss issues of security, migration, and development.Secretary Kelly was welcomed by President Jimmy Morales. According to a press release by Guatemala's Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the two officials "discussed the causes for migration, which in the case of Guatemala are mainly economic reasons." President Morales reiterated the commitment of the Guatemalan government to continue working on generating the economic and social development that the population needs.

Remittances from the U.S. Discourage Mexicans from Working

Throughout his campaign, President-elect Donald Trump spoke of the possibilities of blocking remittances to Mexico or imposing taxes on these transfers, in order to finance the border wall. In response, President Mexican Peña Nieto recently stated that "millions of Mexican families, principally those of low means, depend on these resources." Mexico's concerns are underlined by the fact that remittances are the second highest source of income for the country, behind automotive exports. At the global scale, Mexico is the fourth-largest remittance recipient, following India, China, and the Philippines. Regionally, Mexico accounts for over one-third of remittances sent to Latin American (37.9 percent), making it the top recipient. Guatemala falls second in the region, and receives four times less than Mexico (9.2 percent).

Obama Administration Ends "Wet Foot, Dry Foot" Policy for Cubans

Time after time the Obama administration had declared that it had no intentions of changing U.S. immigration policies towards Cubans. However, yesterday, President Obama announced the end of the "wet foot, dry foot" policy, and the lesser known Cuban Medical Professional Parole Program. Both the U.S. and Cuba called the end of these policies an important step in normalizing bilateral relations. President Obama's statement briefly states the implications of the end of the wet foot, dry foot policy:
Topics: Cuba

Mexico & Central America Prepare for Trump Administration

Earlier this week, the foreign ministers of Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador gathered to coordinate actions on behalf of their citizens in the United States.

During a meeting hosted by Guatemala, the four countries agreed that their priority is to send a message of confidence and calm to their citizens in the United States. (It should be understood that the message is intended for deportable aliens.) The foreign ministers noted, given that the United States' immigration policy has not changed, the work of their respective embassies should be reinforced so they can "lobby with future authorities" in the United States.