Zombie Immigration Programs

No, not the immigration of zombies – I mean programs, in this case "temporary" amnesties, that never die.

Today was the last day for illegal aliens and legal visitors from Liberia to register for Temporary Protected Status. Congress created TPS in 1990 to allow the executive to suspend deportations of (and grant work permits to) illegal aliens from countries where there's been a natural disaster or civil strife. I've written frequently about the bogus nature of TPS (here and here, for instance), but always regarding the fact that while the status isn't technically permanent, like a green card, it's nonetheless renewed indefinitely, long after the home-country emergency has passed. An earlier crop of Liberian illegals, for instance, was granted a "temporary" amnesty in 1991 – and they're still here.

We Need Some Yes/No Answers from Rubio on Immigration

Like Patrick Brennan over at National Review, I too am encouraged by Rubio's seeming commitment to Enforcement First. But whether it's the real thing or just a con hinges on one question: Is he proposing to fully implement universal E-Verify and visa-tracking before asking Congress to grant amnesty to today's illegals, or just pass legislation calling for enforcement.

Topics: Politics

Why Resettle Any Syrian Refugees at All?

The International Rescue Committee, a refugee advocacy group headed by former U.K. foreign secretary David Miliband, has urged the United States to resettle 65,000 refugees from Syria by the end of next year. The head of the State Department bureau in charge of carrying out the U.N.'s instructions on refugees (the U.N. decides who gets to move to the U.S.) said last week, in the AP's words, "that between 1,000 and 2,000 Syrian refugees will be brought to the U.S. by the end of September and several thousand more in 2016." Miliband welcomed this but said "it certainly needs to improve."

The Need for Border Controls

The New York Times ran a story this week on Bulgaria's fence on its border with Turkey, designed to keep Middle Eastern illegal aliens from sneaking into the EU (of which Bulgaria is now a member). Mildly interesting but not that unusual in itself, since Greece already has fenced its land border with Turkey.

What makes this barrier notable is that it replaces the one the Bulgarians dismantled in the late 1990s, a remnant of the Iron Curtain designed to keep people in. The story quotes the former government minister who had overseen the dismantling: "The theory then was that it was antidemocratic to have these kind of devices along the border."