Bush Precedent for Obama Amnesty? Not Even Close

Thursday night the president will announce more details about his long-promised unilateral immigration decrees. Supporters of the president have been claiming that an executive action by President George H.W. Bush in 1990 is a precedent for Obama's sweeping measures. I argued yesterday at National Review Online , that the 1990 grant of the equivalent of deferred action to spouses and minor children of certain IRCA amnesty beneficiaries was not a precedent because – among other reasons – it was so much smaller. (It was called "voluntary departure" – only in the immigration business can "departure" mean that you get to stay.)

How About Just Paying Them More?

Maria Shriver is helping Marriott hotels avoid raising the pay for its housekeepers.

Perhaps fearing that the minimum-wage campaign directed at fast-food restaurants will turn its red and fiery eye toward hotels, Marriott has teamed up with Shriver and her group A Woman's Nation, to launch a campaign dubbed "The Envelope Please." It will "put envelopes in hotel rooms to encourage tipping" at Marriott's various brands, including Courtyard, Residence Inn, J.W. Marriott, Ritz-Carlton, and Renaissance hotels. The hotel chain is even suggesting how much to tip: "Marriott International CEO Arne Sorenson says $1 to $5 per night, depending on room rate, with more for a high-priced suite."

Locked in Immigration Limbo

Fred Bauer has a thoughtful piece at National Review Online that's worth reading. He describes the dangers of today's condition of "bad-faith open borders," where "illegal immigrants are de jure rejected but de facto accepted."

One issue he didn't address was why we're in that situation. The reason for it is the same reason we have so much trouble achieving "sustainable harmony" (as he put it) on immigration: Each side sees the current stalemate as preferable to letting the other side prevail.

Topics: Politics

Why Did the Senate's Amnesty/Immigration-Surge Bill Fail?

Today is the one-year anniversary of Senate passage of S.744, the Schumer-Rubio bill that would have doubled legal immigration and guest workers, legalized the bulk of the illegal-alien population, and promised better enforcement in the future. Now that even Representative Luis Gutierrez, the loudest cheerleader in the House for "comprehensive immigration reform," has admitted that the push for amnesty and increased immigration is dead — at least for now — it's worth considering why it died.