Journalists Are Like a Box of Chocolates

One of the great observations uttered by Forrest Gump in the movie of the same name is that "Life is like a box of chocolates. You never know what you're gonna get." In my years of dealing with the media, I've come to realize that journalists are like life and that box of chocolates: you just don't know what you'll get. Some are hardworking, some are lazy; some go out of their way to try to be balanced, others skew whatever you say; some are open-minded, and others are hostile before you've ever even opened your mouth.

Mexico to Apportion Millions to Fight Deportations from the U.S.

The government of Mexico will establish a $50 million fund to provide attorneys to aliens fighting deportation in the immigration courts of the United States.Interesting. By happenstance, Section 9 of President Trump's executive order on border security directs all cabinet secretaries to put together a list (to be consolidated by the secretary of state) of all direct and indirect foreign aid given to Mexico in the past five years. The consolidated list is to be provided to the president 60 days after the date the executive order was signed (January 25).

Needlessly Risking Naturalization Integrity with Failed Systems

The Department of Homeland Security Office of Inspector General (DHS OIG) has issued a strongly worded report (as such oversight reports go), touching on a potentially perilous and unresolved naturalization issue at U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), the immigration benefits adjudicating agency. It is called "Management Alert - U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services' Use of the Electronic Immigration System for Naturalization Benefits Processing", dated January 19. Despite the typically dry bureaucratically title, the report raises significant problems.

The Security Risks when Cities Provide Funds to Fight Deportation

Britain, which is attempting to deport radical Islamist preacher Hani al-Sibai, has reportedly over the course of several years provided him with £123,000 in legal aid to fight the effort.It seems topsy-turvy, in fact downright crazy, doesn't it, that a government would give an alien the funds to fight that same government's effort to remove him? Especially when the alien is a hate-filled zealot who sits like poison in the heart of a western democracy with the avowed intent to subvert it at every turn?Here in the United States, we can rest secure in the assurance this would not happen, because the law is clear that aliens fighting deportation have the right to an attorney — but only at their own expense. (See Sec. 292 of the Immigration and Nationality Act.) Or can we?

Obama Administration Tackled Tricky Issue of Transgender Immigration at the 11th Hour

Just one day before the inauguration of Donald Trump as president, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) agency charged with adjudication and administration of immigration benefits, issued a policy memorandum: "Revision of Adjudicator's Field Manual Subchapter 10.22 - Change of Gender Designation on Documents Issued by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services".

Remittance Tax to Fund the Wall?

The recent news tidbit that President Trump's transition team had asked what money and infrastructure capabilities might be available to begin the promised border wall (or, more probably, high-tech fencing) promptly fed speculation that he would back off the assertion that "Mexico will pay for it." I'm betting my money on the likelihood that the source will be taxes or penalty fees levied on remittances: funds being sent out of our country by aliens, often illegal aliens who send a portion of the wages from their unauthorized employment back to their home countries, usually to support family.

Will the "Criminal Alien Deportation Enforcement Act" Stall in the Senate?

Rep. Brian Babin (R-Texas) has introduced a bill into the House, the "Criminal Alien Deportation Enforcement Act of 2017", that would cut off foreign aid to any country that "den[ies] or unreasonably delay[s] the acceptance of nationals who have been ordered removed from the United States." One would think it common sense that the United States should not reward other nations when they deliberately throw monkey wrenches into the lawful workings of our deportation processes — but common sense is often in sadly short supply in the nation's capitol.
Topics: Criminal Aliens

Insecure IDs Compromise Security at Military Bases

Earlier this month military.com published this article: "More State IDs No Longer Accepted at Bases". The gist of the article is that U.S. military posts have begun to tighten up on the identity documents required before they will permit entry onto their compounds. It is a commonsense security measure given today's unsettled world, and particularly noteworthy in light of efforts by so many terrorist groups to single out serving members of our armed forces and police. For instance, in 2015 ISIS released a list of 100 U.S. armed forces members' names, addresses, and other data, obviously with the hope that would-be jihadists would follow up with attacks against them here in the homeland.