Absurd Responses from Sanctuary Jurisdiction Leaders after DHS Meeting

On March 29, Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary John Kelly held a meeting with various mayors, sheriffs, and municipal leaders to discuss the pressing problem of sanctuaries: state and local governments that, in one way or another, forbid or impede their law enforcement agencies from cooperating with immigration agents by refusing to honor detainers filed against alien criminals, by obstructing the flow of information about such aliens, by denying agents access to incarcerated aliens for purposes of interviews, or by declaring "safe zones" in which they will attempt to physically prevent agents from access.

Interior Secretaries Say the Darnedest Things

Back when I was working for the federal government, I'd occasionally come upon a person I thought exhibited quiet strength and wisdom when I'd see them sitting through various meetings or whatever. Sometimes on getting to know them, and with closer scrutiny, I'd discover to my consternation that they really weren't very smart at all, but the one single piece of wisdom they'd absorbed is that it's better to stay silent and leave your intellect in question than open your mouth and dispel any doubt whatever that you are shallow or a fool.News media are reporting that Montana Congressman-turned-Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke said publicly that since we don't want to spoil our view of the Rio Grande or put the border wall plunk down into the middle of it, we should put it on the Mexican side. Needless to say, opponents of the Trump administration, opponents of the wall, and pundits in general had a field day.
Topics: Politics

A Massachusetts Lawmaker Teeters on the Edge of a Felony

The Daily Caller has published a story about Democratic Massachusetts State Rep. Michelle DuBois' vigorous efforts to warn a local community of impending ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement) raids via her Facebook account. She apparently deleted (or changed privacy settings) on the series of posts to make them inaccessible after receiving a significant amount of adverse feedback, but the Daily Caller saved and has shown pictures of the posts as a part of the article.

Pro Bono Lawyers Are NOT 'Public Defenders' in Removal Proceedings

The Miami Herald recently published an article, "Free 'public defender's office' would represent immigrants in deportation proceedings", that lays out the nascent effort — spearheaded by former federal judge Shira Scheindlin, under the name "American Immigrant Representation Project" (AIRP) — that its participants hope will eventually establish itself sufficiently to become nationwide and well-entrenched enough to provide representation to most if not all aliens in removal courts.

LAPD Boss Charlie Beck: Fearmonger in Chief

The Associated Press is reporting that Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck has tied a statistical drop for the first quarter of this year in reports of domestic violence and sexual assault crimes by Latinos to fears of deportation. He's quoted as saying: "Imagine your sister, your mother, not reporting a sexual assault for fear that their family will be torn apart." There are, of course, any number of reasons why such a drop might have taken place, and we don't know yet whether it's a statistical anomaly — or even whether the anomaly is the result of book-cooking. If the Obama administration cooked the books at the federal level, and it did, is there any reason to think it might not happen at the local level to advance a political agenda? Certainly Beck has repeatedly demonstrated his sensitivity to the pro-sanctuary vibe of his political bosses in city hall.

Naming and Shaming: The First ICE Weekly Alien Criminal Releases List

Following the directives in one of President Trump's immigration-related executive orders (EOs) and the augmenting instructions in a subsequent policy memorandum from Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary John Kelly, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) has issued its first report identifying state and local jurisdictions that have refused to honor immigration detainers filed to hold alien criminals until they can be taken into custody by ICE agents. The EO directed that ICE prepare the data contained in this report, and make it available in a readily understandable and accessible form for public consumption.The report comes in four parts, the first three being most informative from the public's point of view:

Items in the News: Sanctuary, Denaturalization, and Judges

Immigration is constantly in the news for one reason or the next these days. It's like the cone of silence imposed by the Obama administration has been shattered. (Well, in fact, it has, hasn't it? Wasn't that what the election was all about?) Here is a trio of news items covering various aspects of that endlessly fascinating (and controversial) subject.On Sanctuaries and the Power of Coercion

Replace SCAAP with Funds Tied to Enforcement Cooperation

USA Today ran a story on March 16: "Trump budget cuts immigration aid and local police are stunned": President Trump proposed a massive $4.8 billion increase in spending Thursday to combat illegal immigration, but his plan also includes a cut that stuns local law enforcement officials: a Department of Justice grant that helps pay the cost of jailing undocumented immigrants.
Topics: Criminal Aliens

Noblesse Oblige and Leftist Patronizing from the Ninth Circuit

Several days ago, I wrote a blog post about the federal Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals after its absurd over-reach to sustain the equally absurd ruling of a district court judge in Washington State, who issued a "temporary" restraining order — although curiously it had no end date — against the first iteration of President Trump's executive order suspending visas and refugee entries from certain countries.

ProPublica's Faulty Look at the Value of Border Searches

ProPublica, which bills itself as "journalism in the public interest", recently published a piece by Patrick Lee, "Can Customs and Border Officials Search Your Phone? These Are Your Rights". The article goes much farther than just phones, and digs generally into border authorities, including stops and searches. But I found it hard to actually get that far, because I myself was stopped — floored, in fact — by the very first paragraph: