Can A New Border Security and Immigration Enforcement Bill Pass into Law?

Several Republican members of Congress are reported to be working with the Trump White House to craft a border security and interior immigration enforcement bill. According to the story:

The legislation is still in flux, though copies of an early draft have floated around Washington. The focus will be strengthening defenses at the border and enforcement of immigration laws in the interior of the US, and will likely include a mix of upping resources and staffing at the border as well as tweaking some immigration law and authorities to clear the way for more aggressive immigration enforcement, according to sources familiar with the direction.

This is potentially good news, depending, of course, on the details in the draft legislation. There are a number of prior bills laying fallow that contain some excellent, well-thought-out provisions that could help form the basis of the new effort, but whether that will prove to be the case remains to be seen.

Topics: Politics

Texas's New Anti-Sanctuary Law Draws Predictable Reactions from Open-Borders Advocates

On May 7, Texas Governor Greg Abbott signed into law SB (Senate Bill) 4, a statute forbidding agencies of the state or its political subdivisions from acting as illegal alien sanctuaries. The statute, which comes into effect on September 1, goes so far as to criminalize behavior by officials such as police chiefs and sheriffs who refuse to fully cooperate with federal immigration enforcement efforts by providing information and honoring detainers filed against aliens arrested for criminal offenses. It also establishes civil fines of up to $25,000 daily for towns, cities, and counties that violate the anti-sanctuary law.

State-Based Visas: Unwise, Unworkable, and Constitutionally Dubious

The libertarian Cato Institute recently hosted an event titled "State Based Visas: A Federalism Approach to the Immigration Impasse", featuring two members of Congress, Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wisc.) and Rep. Ken Buck (R-Colo.). The lead-in on the webpage has this to say:

The idea of regional or state-based visas is not a new one. Indeed, Canada and Australia have each implemented successful variations that provide some valuable lessons and hint at the major economic benefits possible for us in the United States. Adoption of a state-based visa program in America would permit our 50 state governments to craft rules for work visa programs that are more adaptable to local economic conditions than the present one-size-fits-all system run from Washington, D.C. While state governors and state and federal lawmakers are warming to the idea, all that stands in the way here is congressional approval.
Topics: Guestworkers

The Silence of the Shams

The Center for Immigration Studies (CIS) recently published an assessment of the president's first 100 days in office, as have many other organizations, pundits, and media outlets. One of the things that several of those other assessments have in common is to fault the president for a relatively sparse record on legislation passed. Although it's true that there hasn't been much — which is deeply distressing in the arena of immigration matters given the great abundance of excellent past bills that have been bottled up in Congress waiting, waiting, waiting to be acted on — I find it somewhat amusing that the president is taking the hit for the dearth of legislation.
Topics: Politics

Perverting the Course of Justice in Brooklyn

Anyone who watches British police procedurals on television is probably aware of the phrase "perverting the course of justice". It is a charge levied against individuals, often police or others in officialdom, who rig the system to arrive at a result contrary to what any reasonable person would expect from the criminal justice system.I thought of that phrase recently, when I blogged about an American prosecutor and judge who did figurative backflips so a serially wife-abusing alien defendant could plea to a charge that would not result in his being subjected to deportation proceedings.As repugnant as that situation was, it involved only a single case.

CORRECTION

[The blog post below is incorrect - the AP report did, in fact, include the reference to 41 alien voters, though many sites that posted the story used only the beginning part, before that information was reported. Our apologies to AP reporter Jonathan Drew.]
Topics: Voter Fraud

Can State Employment Agency Worker Verifications Be Trusted in Sanctuary Jurisdictions?

A few days ago, I blogged about a healthcare workers union that has declared itself a sanctuary. I noted that unions hold a privileged position of trust in the federal immigration laws relating to employment verification and sanctions, and suggested that a union that declares itself a sanctuary dedicated to helping hide illegal aliens from federal detection has by its actions proved incapable of maintaining that position of trust. The appropriate response is twofold: