Another Crack in the Veneer of the Government's Immigration Security Vetting

Sometimes the most newsworthy items come out in the most unlikely places. The Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA), the appellate tribunal of the immigration courts, has published an opinion sustaining an immigration judge's decision to continue the detention of one Hussam Fatahi, allegedly a native of Iraq and citizen of Syria. The facts revealed by the opinion prove, once again, just how vulnerable the nation's immigration security vetting is.

Demeaning Naturalization Through Semantics

The Ninth Circuit Rides Again

Once again the Ninth Circuit has managed to thread a camel through the eye of a needle in its ongoing attempt to eliminate reason from the rule of law where immigration matters are concerned. The circuit court accepted the case de novo (as a case of first impression) because the case had been summarily dismissed in favor of the government by a lower court when presented there.

Trump, Trade, Immigration, and Working Class Americans

I have visited the laid-off factory workers, and the communities crushed by our horrible and unfair trade deals. These are the forgotten men and women of our country, and they are forgotten, but they will not be forgotten long. These are people who work hard but no longer have a voice. I am your voice. ... I pledge to never sign any trade agreement that hurts our workers, or that diminishes our freedom and independence.

Topics: Politics

Immigration Court Backlogs and the Smuggling of Alien Women and Children

Syracuse University's Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse (TRAC) has issued a report showing that despite the addition of new immigration judge resources, the backlog of removal docket cases in the national immigration court system administered by the Department of Justice Executive Office for Immigration Review (DOJ EOIR) continues to grow. As of the end of June, TRAC tells us the backlog is at an all-time high of 496,704 — just short of the half million case mark. With the new additions, there are now 273 immigration judges to handle this staggering caseload.