Better Educated, but Not Better Off

A look at the education level and socioeconomic success of recent immigrants, 2007 to 2017

This analysis confirms other recent research showing a dramatic increase in the education level of newly arrived immigrants over the last decade. However, our findings show that this increase has not resulted in a significant improvement in labor force attachment, income, poverty, or welfare use for new arrivals. 

Strengthening and Reforming America's Immigration Court System

CIS Resident Fellow Testified Before Senate Subcommittee

Andrew Arthur testified before the Senate Subcommittee on Border and Immigration. He will discussed the causes of immigration court backlog and suggest remedies.

Event: A Conversation with EOIR Director James McHenry

Tackling the Immigration Court Backlog

James McHenry, Director of the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR), will be featured in an Immigration Newsmaker conversation hosted by the Center for Immigration Studies on Tuesday, May 1 at 9:30 a.m. at the National Press Club.

Maps: Impact of H-2B Guest Workers in 2017

The H-2B program allows employers to hire temporary foreign workers to fill low-skill, non-agricultural positions. The law provides for an annual cap of 66,000 visas per year, with a few exceptions. 

The Center has created three maps to visualize the DOL's 2017 Foreign Labor Certification data.

Welcoming New Americans

Editor’s Note: These remarks were delivered at a recent swearing-in ceremony for new citizens.

Congratulations, Americans!

You’ve come a long way since you first got here. Whether you came on foot or by bus, or ship, or airplane, you arrived here as strangers — many of you didn’t know the language, some didn’t have any friends or family here, and all of you were at least a little bit nervous about starting a new life in a new country.

Better Educated, but Not Better Off
Better Educated, but Not Better Off
Senate Subcommittee Testimony
Senate Subcommittee Testimony
Event: A Conversation with James McHenry
Event: A Conversation with James McHenry
Maps: H-2B Guest Workers in 2017
Maps: H-2B Guest Workers in 2017
Welcoming New Americans
Welcoming New Americans

A look at the education level and socioeconomic success of recent immigrants, 2007 to 2017

This analysis confirms other recent research showing a dramatic increase in the education level of newly arrived immigrants over the last decade. However, our findings show that this increase has not resulted in a significant improvement in labor force attachment, income, poverty, or welfare use for new arrivals. 

CIS Resident Fellow Testified Before Senate Subcommittee

Andrew Arthur testified before the Senate Subcommittee on Border and Immigration. He will discussed the causes of immigration court backlog and suggest remedies.

Tackling the Immigration Court Backlog

James McHenry, Director of the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR), will be featured in an Immigration Newsmaker conversation hosted by the Center for Immigration Studies on Tuesday, May 1 at 9:30 a.m. at the National Press Club.

The H-2B program allows employers to hire temporary foreign workers to fill low-skill, non-agricultural positions. The law provides for an annual cap of 66,000 visas per year, with a few exceptions. 

The Center has created three maps to visualize the DOL's 2017 Foreign Labor Certification data.

Editor’s Note: These remarks were delivered at a recent swearing-in ceremony for new citizens.

Congratulations, Americans!

You’ve come a long way since you first got here. Whether you came on foot or by bus, or ship, or airplane, you arrived here as strangers — many of you didn’t know the language, some didn’t have any friends or family here, and all of you were at least a little bit nervous about starting a new life in a new country.

Home

Administration Uses Nuances in Two Instances to Restrict Migration

In contrast to the well-publicized and not-yet successful attempts to build a wall (at Mexican expense), or to cut off immigration from several of the smaller Muslim countries (over the bitter opposition of the courts) the administration has moved ahead successfully and quietly to limit immigration in two other quite separate categories.

In both instances the Department of Homeland Security has made micro adjustments in its policies to limit quite specific abuses of the ongoing system without, as far as I can tell, even issuing a press release on the matter.

An ICE Agent Publicly Brings Her Agency into Disrepute, Apparently Without Consequence

On April 13, a woman called into WNYC radio in connection with a discussion of a strike by New York City public defenders to protest Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents attending courtrooms in the city to take custody of alien defendants charged with crimes. The ICE agents do this because the city has enacted stringent sanctuary policies that prohibit its police and corrections officers from cooperating or communicating with ICE over such aliens – or even conducting interviews within their facilities.