Immigrant Population Growth Slows

‘Trump Effect’ likely explains slowdown

Recently released Census data shows the number of immigrants (legal and illegal) grew more slowly from 2017 to 2019 than in prior years.

In the first two years of the Trump administration, growth in the immigrant population averaged only about 200,000 a year, in contrast to 650,000 a year from 2010 to 2017.

Panel: Trump vs. Biden on Immigration

The Center for Immigration Studies hosted a panel analyzing the presidential candidates' positions on immigration and how immigration policy may be impacted by the November 3 election. Immigration has not been widely discussed by either presidential campaign, but the issue has a major impact on many issues Americans care strongly about, including jobs, wages, healthcare, the economy, law enforcement, and education.

Panel: Biometrics in Immigration

Promoting National Security and Community Safety

The Center for Immigration Studies hosted a conversation highlighting the Center's new report on the value of biometrics in immigration enforcement and how that relates to national security and public safety. 

Read report: Biometrics in Immigration

Panel: Overcrowded Housing Among Immigrant and Native-Born Workers

The Center for Immigration Studies hosted a panel discussing a new report, Overcrowded Housing Among Immigrant and Native-Born Workers

Dr. Peter Skerry, a professor of political science at Boston College and a past senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, joined Dr. Steven Camarota, the Center's director of research and co-author of the report.

 

New H-1B Rules to Protect American Workers

The new H-1B rules being announced today are long-overdue moves to protect American workers. These reforms strike directly at the harmful staffing-company model of employment that has commodified these visa workers, displaced qualified Americans, and undermined the integrity of employment visa programs.

Immigrant Population Growth Slows
Immigrant Population Growth Slows
Panel: Trump vs. Biden on Immigration
Panel: Trump vs. Biden on Immigration
Panel: Biometrics in Immigration
Panel: Biometrics in Immigration
Panel: Overcrowded Housing
Panel: Overcrowded Housing
New H-1B Rules
New H-1B Rules

‘Trump Effect’ likely explains slowdown

Recently released Census data shows the number of immigrants (legal and illegal) grew more slowly from 2017 to 2019 than in prior years.

In the first two years of the Trump administration, growth in the immigrant population averaged only about 200,000 a year, in contrast to 650,000 a year from 2010 to 2017.

The Center for Immigration Studies hosted a panel analyzing the presidential candidates' positions on immigration and how immigration policy may be impacted by the November 3 election. Immigration has not been widely discussed by either presidential campaign, but the issue has a major impact on many issues Americans care strongly about, including jobs, wages, healthcare, the economy, law enforcement, and education.

Promoting National Security and Community Safety

The Center for Immigration Studies hosted a conversation highlighting the Center's new report on the value of biometrics in immigration enforcement and how that relates to national security and public safety. 

Read report: Biometrics in Immigration

The Center for Immigration Studies hosted a panel discussing a new report, Overcrowded Housing Among Immigrant and Native-Born Workers

Dr. Peter Skerry, a professor of political science at Boston College and a past senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, joined Dr. Steven Camarota, the Center's director of research and co-author of the report.

 

The new H-1B rules being announced today are long-overdue moves to protect American workers. These reforms strike directly at the harmful staffing-company model of employment that has commodified these visa workers, displaced qualified Americans, and undermined the integrity of employment visa programs.

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September Measures: Government Issuing More Visas than Prior Month

We have been following nine migration measures over the last few months, and the September data (when compared with that of the prior September) show that the U.S. government, while not opening the gates to their fullest potentials, was allowing some more inward traffic.

In each of the nine measures we find a lesser reduction in the September-September comparisons than we did in the August-August ones. This is particularly true in the H-2B class of non-ag, non skilled workers, as well as in the H-2A farm worker category.