EVENT: A Conversation with USCIS Acting Director Ken Cuccinelli

Ken Cuccinelli, Acting Director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, will be featured in an Immigration Newsmaker conversation hosted by the Center for Immigration Studies on Thursday, September 26, at 1 p.m. at the National Press Club. Please RSVP to Marguerite Telford via email if you would like to reserve a seat; media is given priority.

SCOTUS Hands Trump Win on Third-Country Transit Bar to Asylum

SCOTUS does not appear to be willing to allow individual judges set immigration policy for the U.S. as a whole. That is good for immigration enforcement and policy, ultimately good for the courts themselves, and most importantly, good for our republican system of government.

Read more: 

A Quick Reflection on a Dissenter in SCOTUS Decision

One Downside to SCOTUS Decision

The FY 2020 Refugee Ceiling?

15,000 could cover all UNHCR urgent and emergency submissions worldwide next year.

President Trump's determination of the FY 2020 refugee resettlement ceiling is set to take place very soon. Refugee admissions this upcoming fiscal year are set to drop dramatically, perhaps even to zero.

More: Resettlement Is Only the Tip of the Refugee-Protection Iceberg

Panel: Foreign Students and National Security

Video and transcript now available.

The Center for Immigration Studies hosted a panel discussion focusing on the potential national security risk posed by our current policies relating to foreign students and exchange visitors. 

Related Report: How U.S. Foreign Student and Exchange Visitor Policies Undercut National Security

Trump Administration Announces Public Charge Rule

The new rule would favor economically self-reliant immigrants for green cards

USCIS Acting Director Ken Cuccinelli said this would protect American taxpayers and ensure that new immigrants are able to pay their own bills.

Read more: Trump’s Commonsense Rule on Immigrant Welfare Use

Newsmaker Series Event
Newsmaker Series Event
SCOTUS Asylum Decision
SCOTUS Asylum Decision
2020 Refugee Ceiling
2020 Refugee Ceiling
Panel: Foreign Students
Panel: Foreign Students
New Public Charge Rule
New Public Charge Rule

Ken Cuccinelli, Acting Director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, will be featured in an Immigration Newsmaker conversation hosted by the Center for Immigration Studies on Thursday, September 26, at 1 p.m. at the National Press Club. Please RSVP to Marguerite Telford via email if you would like to reserve a seat; media is given priority.

SCOTUS does not appear to be willing to allow individual judges set immigration policy for the U.S. as a whole. That is good for immigration enforcement and policy, ultimately good for the courts themselves, and most importantly, good for our republican system of government.

Read more: 

A Quick Reflection on a Dissenter in SCOTUS Decision

One Downside to SCOTUS Decision

15,000 could cover all UNHCR urgent and emergency submissions worldwide next year.

President Trump's determination of the FY 2020 refugee resettlement ceiling is set to take place very soon. Refugee admissions this upcoming fiscal year are set to drop dramatically, perhaps even to zero.

More: Resettlement Is Only the Tip of the Refugee-Protection Iceberg

Video and transcript now available.

The Center for Immigration Studies hosted a panel discussion focusing on the potential national security risk posed by our current policies relating to foreign students and exchange visitors. 

Related Report: How U.S. Foreign Student and Exchange Visitor Policies Undercut National Security

The new rule would favor economically self-reliant immigrants for green cards

USCIS Acting Director Ken Cuccinelli said this would protect American taxpayers and ensure that new immigrants are able to pay their own bills.

Read more: Trump’s Commonsense Rule on Immigrant Welfare Use

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CRS Analysis of the Revised Public Charge Rules Starts with an Error

When U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, a subordinate agency within the Department of Homeland Security (USCIS/DHS), proposed to issue new rules to limit the use of social welfare programs by immigrants intending to adjust status to lawful permanent residence, else risk being deemed ineligible and thus removable as a "public charge", one could be forgiven for thinking that the sky had fallen in.

Topics: Welfare