Estimating Illegal Immigrant Receipt of Cash Payments from the EITC and ACTC

Millions of illegal immigrants have Social Security numbers, potentially allowing them to receive cash payments from the Earned Income Tax Credit and the Additional Child Tax Credit. We estimate that illegal immigrants may receive between $3.8 and $4.5 billion from the two programs. This is in addition to the $4.4 billion we have previously estimated illegals likely received in stimulus checks this year.

Hearing: The Juvenile Justice Pipeline and the Road Back to Integration

To address the problem of juvenile delinquency in our communities and conserve resources in this system that are needed to handle its traditional caseload, Congress should start by fixing the parts of the immigration law that add to the problem by enticing citizens of other countries to hire smugglers to bring families and minors to cross our border illegally.

"All You Americans Are Fired": The Controversial H-2B Guestworker Program

Parsing Immigration Policy, Episode 3

The Biden administration recently increased the H-2B visa cap, allowing more low-skilled, non-agricultural seasonal workers into the country. Jessica Vaughan, the Center’s director of policy studies, discusses this guestworker visa program, which creates the false impression of "jobs Americans won't do" by incentivizing employers to use a business model that is reliant on temporary worker programs.

Addressing Root Causes in the Northern Triangle?

In this report, we explore how the proposed economic assistance funds could be best used to target the root causes of illegal immigration, emphasizing the need for a data-driven plan that would include a Covid-19 vaccination program, an export-expansion program, crime control and family-planning efforts, and a cash payment program for people who agree, on pain of imprisonment, not to go to the U.S.

Amnesty Would Impose Large Costs on Social Security and Medicare

Under current law, illegal immigrants are net contributors to Social Security and Medicare because they partially pay in to entitlement programs but cannot legally receive benefits. By granting eligibility for benefits, however, amnesty would transform illegal immigrants from net contributors into net beneficiaries, imposing steep costs on the Social Security and Medicare trust funds.

Illegal Aliens and the EITC/ACTC
Illegal Aliens and the EITC/ACTC
Hearing: Juvenile Justice Pipeline
Hearing: Juvenile Justice Pipeline
Podcast: "All You Americans Are Fired"
Podcast: "All You Americans Are Fired"
Addressing Root Causes
Addressing Root Causes
Social Security and Medicare
Social Security and Medicare

Millions of illegal immigrants have Social Security numbers, potentially allowing them to receive cash payments from the Earned Income Tax Credit and the Additional Child Tax Credit. We estimate that illegal immigrants may receive between $3.8 and $4.5 billion from the two programs. This is in addition to the $4.4 billion we have previously estimated illegals likely received in stimulus checks this year.

To address the problem of juvenile delinquency in our communities and conserve resources in this system that are needed to handle its traditional caseload, Congress should start by fixing the parts of the immigration law that add to the problem by enticing citizens of other countries to hire smugglers to bring families and minors to cross our border illegally.

Parsing Immigration Policy, Episode 3

The Biden administration recently increased the H-2B visa cap, allowing more low-skilled, non-agricultural seasonal workers into the country. Jessica Vaughan, the Center’s director of policy studies, discusses this guestworker visa program, which creates the false impression of "jobs Americans won't do" by incentivizing employers to use a business model that is reliant on temporary worker programs.

In this report, we explore how the proposed economic assistance funds could be best used to target the root causes of illegal immigration, emphasizing the need for a data-driven plan that would include a Covid-19 vaccination program, an export-expansion program, crime control and family-planning efforts, and a cash payment program for people who agree, on pain of imprisonment, not to go to the U.S.

Under current law, illegal immigrants are net contributors to Social Security and Medicare because they partially pay in to entitlement programs but cannot legally receive benefits. By granting eligibility for benefits, however, amnesty would transform illegal immigrants from net contributors into net beneficiaries, imposing steep costs on the Social Security and Medicare trust funds.

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More than 40,000 ‘Got-Aways’ at the Border in April

And we can’t stop most of the drugs entering illegally, but Mayorkas offers no suggestions for policy change

DHS Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas appeared before the Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee on Thursday to discuss unaccompanied migrant children. Sen. Rob Portman (R-Ohio) revealed a shocking fact at that hearing (one Mayorkas did not dispute): Border Patrol “conservatively estimates that over 40,000 people who crossed illegally got away and were not apprehended in April.”

Why Does the Biden Administration Fear Transparency in Immigration Data?

ICE's unpersuasive response regarding information on foreign student fraud

My guess is that ICE has not published the 2020 OPT employer data because it looks even worse than prior years. It might be that fraudulent employers now make up an even greater portion of the OPT program, and the Biden administration doesn’t want the public to see how much of a public safety threat the OPT program has become. Without the data, we are left to speculate.

Surprising Takeaways in AP Article on Child Migrant Detention

Taxpayer-funded airline tickets for children flying alone, dangerous detention allegations, voluntary family separation, and truncated vetting times

In a May 12 post, I referenced an AP article on complaints about detention facilities run by HHS for unaccompanied alien children apprehended by CBP at the Southwest border. That May 11 AP article jumps around a lot (and fails to address some key questions), but there are also some surprising takeaways therein.