Stopping the Practice of Citizenship for Sale

Birth tourism in the United States and Canada

A new report examines the practice, and negative impacts, of birth tourism in the United States and other developed countries, and recommends policies to minimize the practice of selling citizenship.

Testimony: Oversight of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services

Jessica Vaughan, the Center's Director of Policy Studies, testified before the U.S. House Judiciary Committee's Subcommittee on Immigration and Citizenship hearing on the oversight and funding of USCIS, the DHS agency which administers the nation's lawful immigration system. A furlough of 13,400 USCIS employees was recently postponed while the fee-funded agency struggles with a funding shortage.

Unemployment of Immigrants & Natives June 2020

Slightly more improvement for immigrants, but still dismal for both groups

A new analysis by the Center for Immigration shows that while there was some improvement in the number and share of native-born Americans and immigrants (legal and illegal) out of work, unemployment remains extraordinarily high.

Resettlement Agencies Decide Where Refugees Are Initially Placed in the United States

Not refugees (or state and local officials)

Nine religious or community-based organizations, called resettlement agencies, have contracts with the Department of State to resettle refugees inside the US.

Representatives from these agencies determine where refugees are placed.

Read also: Refugee Placement and Medical Concerns Amid a Covid-19 Pandemic and an Economic Crisis

New Book: Losing Control

How a Left-Right Coalition Blocked Immigration Reform and Provoked the Backlash That Elected Trump

Losing Control is the story of how a left-right coalition of immigrant-rights groups, activists, and business interests thwarted the 1986 immigration reform law.

Written by a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, it combines reporting and historical narrative to show how Washington's failure provoked the backlash that led Donald Trump to victory.

Birthright Citizenship for Sale
Birthright Citizenship for Sale
Congressional Oversight of USCIS
Congressional Oversight of USCIS
June 2020 Employment Situation
June 2020 Employment Situation
Who Decides Where Refugees are Placed?
Who Decides Where Refugees are Placed?
New Book: Losing Control
New Book: Losing Control

Birth tourism in the United States and Canada

A new report examines the practice, and negative impacts, of birth tourism in the United States and other developed countries, and recommends policies to minimize the practice of selling citizenship.

Jessica Vaughan, the Center's Director of Policy Studies, testified before the U.S. House Judiciary Committee's Subcommittee on Immigration and Citizenship hearing on the oversight and funding of USCIS, the DHS agency which administers the nation's lawful immigration system. A furlough of 13,400 USCIS employees was recently postponed while the fee-funded agency struggles with a funding shortage.

Slightly more improvement for immigrants, but still dismal for both groups

A new analysis by the Center for Immigration shows that while there was some improvement in the number and share of native-born Americans and immigrants (legal and illegal) out of work, unemployment remains extraordinarily high.

Not refugees (or state and local officials)

Nine religious or community-based organizations, called resettlement agencies, have contracts with the Department of State to resettle refugees inside the US.

Representatives from these agencies determine where refugees are placed.

Read also: Refugee Placement and Medical Concerns Amid a Covid-19 Pandemic and an Economic Crisis

How a Left-Right Coalition Blocked Immigration Reform and Provoked the Backlash That Elected Trump

Losing Control is the story of how a left-right coalition of immigrant-rights groups, activists, and business interests thwarted the 1986 immigration reform law.

Written by a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, it combines reporting and historical narrative to show how Washington's failure provoked the backlash that led Donald Trump to victory.

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Big H-1B and L-1 Users To Be Hit with Higher Fees for Visa Extensions

A piece of good news for those of us who think the H-1B program is over-used and displaces American workers: Starting in October one set of major users of the program will have to pay substantially higher fees when they want to extend the visas of H-1B and L workers currently on their payrolls, according to the San Jose Mercury-News.

This will raise $200 million a year for a fee-starved USCIS.

U.S. Attorney Announces Indictments in Southern Mississippi Poultry Plant Case

I told you they were coming a year ago — and may be just the beginning

Grand juries are particularly sluggish in their work — which is good for all of us, because a rush to judgment would snare a lot of innocent people. It took almost a year, but DOJ announced Thursday that four different individuals have been indicted and are facing criminal charges. Those charges range from harboring illegal aliens, to assisting those aliens in passing themselves off as United States citizens and obtaining fraudulent Social Security cards, to false statements to federal officials.

The 2020 USCIS Ombudsman Report: A Book Review

The annual reports of the government-funded agencies critiquing other government agencies, such as those of the Government Accountability Office (GAO), the various inspectors-general, and the USCIS Ombudsman's Office, tend to be worthy, careful, and often dull documents. But sometimes there's a gem or two hidden therein, which is the case for the recently released USCIS Ombudsman's report.

Going after the Employers of Illegal Aliens

One year ago, ICE raided multiple chicken plants in Mississippi, arresting hundreds of illegal aliens. Dozens of them have been convicted of various federal crimes, such as identity theft and document fraud.

But what about their employers? Simply arresting a bunch of illegals, and leaving it at that, is both unjust and ineffective. Unjust because it lets the other participant in the criminal transaction off the hook, and ineffective because employers can just hire another batch of illegal aliens and essentially write off the disruption as a cost of doing business.