New Data Shows Falloff in Immigration in 2017

Decline does not reflect recent surge at southwest border

A new analysis shows 1.45 million new legal and illegal immigrants settled in the United States in 2017, less than the 1.75 million in 2016 or the 1.62 million in 2015

The decline in arrivals in 2017 may be due to the increased enforcement efforts, lower refugee admissions, and more robust vetting of applicants undertaken by the Trump administration.

Panel: Terrorist Migration Across Europe's Borders

The Center for Immigration Studies held a panel discussion on how migration and terrorism have combined to be a destructive force in Europe and what America can learn from the European experience. The starting point for conversation was a report documenting Europe's migrant terrorism experience, analyzing the U.S. threat, and proposing U.S. border security improvements.

Read the report.

67.3 Million in the United States Spoke a Foreign Language at Home in 2018

In nine states, one in four residents now speaks a language other than English at

Based on analysis of newly released Census Bureau data for 2018, the Center for Immigration Studies finds that 67.3 million residents in the United States now speak a language other than English at home. The number has nearly tripled since 1980, and more than doubled since 1990. 

Panel: No Americans Need Apply

The Center for Immigration Studies hosted a panel focusing on employer discrimination against native-born workers.

The conversation centered on the release of a report examining real-world case studies in which the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has sued employers for systematically favoring low-skill immigrants over native workers.

Read the Report.

Latest Census Bureau Surveys Do Not Agree on Size and Growth of Immigrant Population

The two Census Bureau surveys that measure the foreign-born population have recently diverged in unexpected ways.  The significant differences between the two surveys raise questions about the size and growth in the nation's legal and illegal immigrant populations. For this reason, reporters and commentators should be cautious in interpreting the data until a clearer picture emerges.

 

Data: Immigration Decline in 2017
Data: Immigration Decline in 2017
Panel: Terrorist Migration
Panel: Terrorist Migration
Foreign Languages at Home
Foreign Languages at Home
Panel: No Americans Need Apply
Panel: No Americans Need Apply
Census Surveys Diverge
Census Surveys Diverge

Decline does not reflect recent surge at southwest border

A new analysis shows 1.45 million new legal and illegal immigrants settled in the United States in 2017, less than the 1.75 million in 2016 or the 1.62 million in 2015

The decline in arrivals in 2017 may be due to the increased enforcement efforts, lower refugee admissions, and more robust vetting of applicants undertaken by the Trump administration.

The Center for Immigration Studies held a panel discussion on how migration and terrorism have combined to be a destructive force in Europe and what America can learn from the European experience. The starting point for conversation was a report documenting Europe's migrant terrorism experience, analyzing the U.S. threat, and proposing U.S. border security improvements.

Read the report.

In nine states, one in four residents now speaks a language other than English at

Based on analysis of newly released Census Bureau data for 2018, the Center for Immigration Studies finds that 67.3 million residents in the United States now speak a language other than English at home. The number has nearly tripled since 1980, and more than doubled since 1990. 

The Center for Immigration Studies hosted a panel focusing on employer discrimination against native-born workers.

The conversation centered on the release of a report examining real-world case studies in which the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has sued employers for systematically favoring low-skill immigrants over native workers.

Read the Report.

The two Census Bureau surveys that measure the foreign-born population have recently diverged in unexpected ways.  The significant differences between the two surveys raise questions about the size and growth in the nation's legal and illegal immigrant populations. For this reason, reporters and commentators should be cautious in interpreting the data until a clearer picture emerges.

 

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Haitians Try to Storm Mexican Immigration Office

More than 200 Haitian migrants engaged in a physical confrontation with Mexican immigration agents and National Guardsmen in the southern city of Tapachula last week.

According to the National Institute of Migration (INM), the clash occurred when the migrants attempted to force their way into the migration regularization offices of the INM. It was reported that pushing and punching occurred outside the offices.

Topics: Mexico

Genuine Foreign Students Decline in Number, but Alien Grads Masquerading as OPT 'Students' Increase Nearly 10 Percent

The headline on the November 18 press release from the Institute of International Education, "Number of International Students in the United States Hits All-Time High", is simply a lie and the State Department should cease funding the IIE's survey until it stops cheating with numbers.