Immigration Blog

DHS Files Last-Ditch Motion to Preserve Improper OPT Rules

By John Miano, December 27, 2015

As we have reported previously, the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia vacated new regulations for the Optional Practical Training (OPT) program effective February 12, 2016. The court gave DHS a six-month delay to allow it to take some form of corrective action. The deadline for DHS to correct by getting a new rule in place has come and gone.

(OPT is for foreign workers masquerading as students; the new regulations extend the period of time foreign graduates in STEM fields (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) could work under PT status.) Read more...

One More Bit of Evidence in the H-2B Numbers Controversy

By David North, December 23, 2015

Let me add one more fact on the ongoing controversy about the admissions of H-2B alien workers – all taking jobs that Americans should have – that Speaker Ryan stirred up by estimating that the omnibus spending bill would permit the admission of "only" 8,000 of them.

This note supplements earlier postings of my colleague, John Miano, and my own on this subject. Read more...

Speaker Ryan's Unpersuasive Response on H-2B Visas

By John Miano, December 23, 2015

On Monday I was one of many to write about the travesty of Paul Ryan's corrupt business-as-usual-in-Washington budget bill. Yesterday, Speaker Ryan responded to the critics, a response that shows how deprived of reality the leaders are in Congress.

The main area of contention is the changes to the H-2B visa program. (My colleague David North also addresses Ryan's assertions about the program.)

The speaker's response starts off with the heading, "And Nothing Was 'Slipped' into the Bill Either."

To which I have to ask, how stupid does Speaker Ryan think we are? Read more...

Ryan, Ignoring DOL data, Badly Understates Congress' Impact on H-2B

By David North, December 23, 2015

House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) has substantially under-stated the estimated impact of a congressional sleight-of-hand regarding the number of H-2B alien workers who will, by definition, take jobs away from resident (citizen and green-card) workers.

In a press statement yesterday Ryan said that his critics on this issue were making a "mountain out of a molehill." Depriving Americans of jobs apparently is not something he worries about. Read more...

Open Borders, Anyone?

By Dan Cadman, December 22, 2015

People who read blogs or publications from the Center for Immigration Studies will likely see the phrase "open borders" on a regular basis. Some may assume it's used hyperbolically. After all, are there really people who advocate open borders? There are. They even have their own websites – visit them if you wish; I'm not going to link to them, but you can find them easily enough. Read more...

Gem Buried in the Spending Bill – Double H-1B Fees for Outsourcing Firms

By David North, December 22, 2015

A nice little gem can be found in the omnibus spending bill signed the other day by the president – a doubling of, and an expansion of, the fees paid by Indian outsourcing companies when they hire either H-1 or L-1 workers.

This counterbalances, to a minor extent, the losses that other immigration-related parts of the same bill have inflicted upon us, as my colleagues John Miano and Dan Cadman have reported. Read more...

Mexico Waves U.S.-Bound Cubans Through

By Kausha Luna, December 22, 2015

Amid the Cuban migrant standoff in Costa Rica, Mexico's migration policy towards Cubans headed for the United States should be of even greater concern to the United States.

Approximately 5,000 U.S.-bound Cubans are stranded in Costa Rica, after Nicaragua closed its border to them. Ever since, Costa Rica has been hard at work trying to create a "humanitarian corridor" across Central America, which would allow Cubans to freely head north to the U.S. border (where they will receive automatic legal status under the "wet foot/dry foot" policy). Costa Rica has also suggested flying the islanders to Guatemala or Belize, from which they could enter Mexico and make their way north to the United States. Read more...

Human Nature vs. the Blank Slate
Food for thought from Steven Pinker and Edmund Burke

By Jerry Kammer, December 22, 2015
Food for thought from Steven Pinker and Edmund Burke

Those of us who want to regulate immigration think of ourselves as pragmatists who recognize that too much even of a good thing can be a bad thing. But we often face the accusation that we are racists, bigots, and xenophobes with bad manners and intolerable politics. It is a situation akin to the poisoned atmosphere that MIT psychologist and author Steven Pinker describes as the result of attacks on cognitive scientists who suggested that genes influence human personality and behavior. Read more...

San Bernardino Puts Focus on Immigration-Through-Marriage, or Should

By David North, December 21, 2015

Let's step back and look at the immigration-by-marriage process – the one that led to, among other things, the slaughter in San Bernardino, where one of the shooters had come to the U.S. on a K-1 (fiancé) visa.

The first point to be made is that a huge proportion of legal immigration pours through the marital route, though more than 90 percent of the newly-arrived spouses and spouses-to-be do not use the K-1 visa. For example, in fiscal 2013, the last year for which we have statistics, about 245,000 of the year's roughly one million immigrants who arrived (or adjusted) were recorded as spouses of citizens or aliens. (This count excludes aliens arriving as married couples.) Read more...

Welcoming Syrian Refugees: Not Just "How Many?" but also "How?"

By Nayla Rush, December 21, 2015

The current debate about refugees often revolves around numbers – how many should be allowed in? – while little attention is given to the issue of integration. Jenny Phillimore, Professor and Director of the Institute for Research into Superdiversity (IRIS) at the University of Birmingham, asks in a blogpost: "Where is integration in the refugee crisis?" Read more...