Immigration Blog

Immigration Questions for the Democratic Debate, Part 1

By Jon Feere, October 12, 2015

From the start of my op-ed posted today at

Democratic Party candidates for the 2016 presidential election will hold their first debate this week on CNN. It will be moderated by Anderson Cooper and additional questions will be posed by Dana Bash, Don Lemon and Juan Carlos Lopez. This two-part op-ed offers 10 questions on immigration in total that will help make for an informative debate. The questions are designed to get the candidates' thoughts on the impact of immigration policy and to also drill down into the philosophical arguments behind their positions on key issues like sanctuary cities, refugee resettlement and executive action.

Presidential Candidates' Worker-Protection Immigration Grades

By David North, October 12, 2015

NumbersUSA routinely issues voting-record grades on migration reduction matters for all members of Congress, from A+ down to F-. It now has done the same thing for 18 announced candidates for president (plus Vice President Biden, who may become a candidate). These are the scores on what NumbersUSA calls worker-protection immigration grades: Read more...

Honduras Faces a Surge of Cubans Headed for the U.S.

By Kausha Luna, October 12, 2015

Honduran immigration offices are being inundated by an influx of illegal Cubans. Last Tuesday, alone, 360 Cubans were detained at the Honduran border with Nicaragua.

Over the past ten years more than 300,000 Cubans have gone through Honduras to the United States in a daily flow which is "likely to increase," , said Rene Gomez, a spokesman for Honduras' National Migration Institute (INM) last week. Cuban migrants, despite being initially detained, are not deported from Honduras. Instead, illegal aliens are given a 72-hour "safe-passage" permit to travel through the country. They then make their way to the border with Guatemala and continue on through Mexico to the United States. This policy is clearly not in the interest of the United States, which would be better served if Honduras deported illegal aliens, rather than waving them through. Read more...

The Wall Street Journal's Misguided Attack on the CIS Immigrant Welfare Study

By Steven A. Camarota, October 9, 2015

The Wall Street Journal published an editorial this week that highlighted the positive aspects of the National Research Council's mixed assessment of immigrant integration. The Journal's positive spin is unsurprising, given that its editors have been advocates of open borders for decades.

More surprising – or if not surprising, at least disappointing – is that the Journal included a deeply misguided attack on CIS's recent study of immigrant welfare usage. Our study found that 51 percent of immigrant-headed households used at least one form of welfare in 2012, compared to 30 percent of native households. Here is how the Journal described that study: Read more...

Jorge Ramos: Misstatement of the Month

By Dan Cadman, October 9, 2015

Reading the two recent postings by my colleague Jerry Kammer on Jorge Ramos' interview with NPR's "Fresh Air" host Terry Gross (see here and here), what caught my particular attention was this quote from Ramos, contained in the first blog:

In other words, they didn't come here to go to Disneyland. They came here to work. They came here to do the jobs that nobody else wants to do.

Wrong on all counts.

The Ramos Rules, Pt. 2

By Jerry Kammer, October 8, 2015

Read part 1.

In an interview with NPR's Terry Gross on Monday, Univision anchorman Jorge Ramos provided this explanation for his willingness to speak with people such as Donald Trump, Ann Coulter, Arizona sheriff Joe Arpaio, and Fox newsman Sean Hannity, whose views on immigration he strongly opposes: Read more...

Federal Appellate Court Rules American Samoans Are U.S. Nationals, not Citizens

By Dan Cadman, October 8, 2015

Just when you think the fiery debate over birthright citizenship has exhausted itself for the moment, a court comes along and breathes a bit of new life into the embers.

This time, the subject involves the tiny territory of American Samoa, consisting of five small islands and atolls in the South Pacific that have a combined land mass of about 76 square miles and a population of 54,343. As for the economy? Next time you eat tuna salad, think American Samoa, which has processing plants that employ many of the islands' natives. The islands also do a thriving business in copra (dried coconut meat). Note also that American Samoa is to be distinguished from the Independent State of Samoa (the former Western Samoa). Read more...

The Ramos Rules
Univision anchor: "Undocumented immigrants" should be treated like those who came legally.

By Jerry Kammer, October 7, 2015
Univision anchor: "Undocumented immigrants" should be treated like those who came legally.

In an interview with Terry Gross for her "Fresh Air" program on NPR Monday, Univision anchorman Jorge Ramos provided a glimpse into his reasoning on immigration. As seen in the excerpts below, Ramos makes no distinction between "undocumented immigrants" and legal immigrants. He believes that since Sens. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) and Ted Cruz (R-Texas) are Latinos whose parents immigrated to the United States they should support illegal immigration. Read more...

Administration Extends Idea of 'Extreme Hardship' to Ridiculous Extremes

By David North, October 7, 2015

"That was in another country; and besides, the wench is dead." — Christopher Marlowe

Here's the situation: An illegal alien (let's say the alien is male) is about to be deported, but he seeks a waiver on the grounds that such a move would bring an "extreme hardship to his citizen wife" so he should be allowed to stay.

OK, but what if the wife dies? What if she dies and the illegal has re-married? Can the hardship on the former (and now dead) wife be used to seek the waiver that will allow him to stay? Read more...

The Results Are In: Obama Never Intended to Enforce Immigration Law

By Mark Krikorian, October 7, 2015

Using preliminary numbers, the Associated Press reports that deportations are down to the lowest level in nearly a decade. As you can see from the graphic, deportations (or, strictly speaking, removals attributed to ICE rather than to the Border Patrol) grew significantly under Bush (as they had under Clinton), initially plateaued under Obama, and are now collapsing. Read more...