Immigration Blog

Remittances from the U.S. Discourage Mexicans from Working

By Kausha Luna, January 25, 2017

Throughout his campaign, President-elect Donald Trump spoke of the possibilities of blocking remittances to Mexico or imposing taxes on these transfers, in order to finance the border wall. In response, President Mexican Peña Nieto recently stated that "millions of Mexican families, principally those of low means, depend on these resources."

Mexico's concerns are underlined by the fact that remittances are the second highest source of income for the country, behind automotive exports. At the global scale, Mexico is the fourth-largest remittance recipient, following India, China, and the Philippines. Regionally, Mexico accounts for over one-third of remittances sent to Latin American (37.9 percent), making it the top recipient. Guatemala falls second in the region, and receives four times less than Mexico (9.2 percent). Read more...

Needlessly Risking Naturalization Integrity with Failed Systems

By Dan Cadman, January 24, 2017

The Department of Homeland Security Office of Inspector General (DHS OIG) has issued a strongly worded report (as such oversight reports go), touching on a potentially perilous and unresolved naturalization issue at U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), the immigration benefits adjudicating agency. It is called "Management Alert - U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services' Use of the Electronic Immigration System for Naturalization Benefits Processing", dated January 19. Despite the typically dry bureaucratically title, the report raises significant problems. Read more...

Mexican President Outlines Objectives for Relations with New U.S. Administration

By Kausha Luna, January 24, 2017

On Monday, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto announced Mexico's top principles and objectives for its relationship with the United States under the new Trump administration. Read more...

The Security Risks when Cities Provide Funds to Fight Deportation

By Dan Cadman, January 24, 2017

Britain, which is attempting to deport radical Islamist preacher Hani al-Sibai, has reportedly over the course of several years provided him with £123,000 in legal aid to fight the effort.

It seems topsy-turvy, in fact downright crazy, doesn't it, that a government would give an alien the funds to fight that same government's effort to remove him? Especially when the alien is a hate-filled zealot who sits like poison in the heart of a western democracy with the avowed intent to subvert it at every turn?

Here in the United States, we can rest secure in the assurance this would not happen, because the law is clear that aliens fighting deportation have the right to an attorney — but only at their own expense. (See Sec. 292 of the Immigration and Nationality Act.) Or can we? Read more...

Obama Administration Tackled Tricky Issue of Transgender Immigration at the 11th Hour

By Dan Cadman, January 24, 2017

Just one day before the inauguration of Donald Trump as president, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) agency charged with adjudication and administration of immigration benefits, issued a policy memorandum: "Revision of Adjudicator's Field Manual Subchapter 10.22 - Change of Gender Designation on Documents Issued by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services". Read more...

Oracle Sued: White Males, Indians Receive Different Kinds of Favoritism

By David North, January 24, 2017

Oracle, the big IT company, has been sued by the U.S. Department of Labor for simultaneously:

  • Discriminating in favor of white males in terms of compensation; and
  • Discriminating in favor of Indians, in terms of hiring.

While I do not doubt for a minute that the charges are appropriate, it is a strange case. It was filed by the Obama administration within 48 hours of the end of its term; its odd mix of charges is something I have never seen before; and the firm's partial reliance on H-1B workers is not even mentioned, although this is the mechanism it uses to hire many Indian workers. Read more...

Is Trump Going to Cancel DACA or Not?

By Mark Krikorian, January 23, 2017

Politicians will always disappoint you. Rich Lowry at National Review tells the story of how, during the few hours he was considering a run for New York City mayor, he found himself already starting to waffle on principle to a potential voter in the elevator. If I were ever so unwise as to run for office, I too would no doubt disappoint those who unwisely voted for me.

So I was fully prepared for the Trump administration to do some things I wouldn't be happy with. But I expected the problems to arise in the area of foreign-worker visas; the president, while running for the nomination, made frequent statements in support of importing foreign workers on visas. (See here and here and here.) Read more...

Remittance Tax to Fund the Wall?

By Dan Cadman, January 23, 2017

The recent news tidbit that President Trump's transition team had asked what money and infrastructure capabilities might be available to begin the promised border wall (or, more probably, high-tech fencing) promptly fed speculation that he would back off the assertion that "Mexico will pay for it." I'm betting my money on the likelihood that the source will be taxes or penalty fees levied on remittances: funds being sent out of our country by aliens, often illegal aliens who send a portion of the wages from their unauthorized employment back to their home countries, usually to support family. Read more...

Here's an Idea: Fly Those Stranded Cubans Home and Pay Them $2K Each

By David North, January 23, 2017

We are reading about Cubans who thought they could use the wet foot-dry foot program to secure legal status in the United States after an illegal entry.

Now they are stranded on the other side of the U.S. border, or on the way to it, thanks to the last-minute decision of the Obama administration to (appropriately) end the earlier policy toward Cuban illegals. Read more...

Will the "Criminal Alien Deportation Enforcement Act" Stall in the Senate?

By Dan Cadman, January 23, 2017

Rep. Brian Babin (R-Texas) has introduced a bill into the House, the "Criminal Alien Deportation Enforcement Act of 2017", that would cut off foreign aid to any country that "den[ies] or unreasonably delay[s] the acceptance of nationals who have been ordered removed from the United States."

One would think it common sense that the United States should not reward other nations when they deliberately throw monkey wrenches into the lawful workings of our deportation processes — but common sense is often in sadly short supply in the nation's capitol. Read more...