Immigration Blog

In the Election Aftermath, Media Observations on the Need for a Civil Discussion of Immigration

By Jerry Kammer, November 10, 2016

I opposed Donald Trump's presidential candidacy, but welcomed his success in making immigration policy a centerpiece of the campaign despite efforts by leaders of both major parties to avoid it. It is good to see that this discussion has been an important theme in the aftermath of an election that may be remembered as the most stunning in American history. Here are some of the comments I have come across. Immigration is not explicitly mentioned in all of them, but I think it is part of the subtext. Read more...

The Coming End of DACA and DAPA

By John Miano, November 10, 2016

Four years ago I pointed out the fundamental problem with the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program: Anyone who signed up for DACA would be adding their names to a list of self-identified illegal aliens. Should a future administration decide that it would start enforcing the law, the DACA program would provide list of prime candidates for deportation.

At the time, this was so obvious that I was surprised anyone would be stupid enough to sign up for DACA and DAPA (Deferred Action for Parents of Americans). Yet apparently hundreds of thousands of people did so anyway. Read more...

Stability Prevails in the Leadership/Membership of Migration Committees

By David North, November 10, 2016

Tuesday's elections, despite Donald Trump's victory, made virtually no impact on the leadership or the membership of the two congressional immigration committees.

With the Republicans holding their majorities in both houses, the leadership of the Senate and House Judiciary committees and their respective immigration subcommittees will remain in GOP hands. Further, all members of both full committees and the subcommittees who sought re-election secured it or, in the case of 10 of the 15 senators, they were not subject to re-election. Read more...

Looking Ahead

By Dan Cadman, November 9, 2016

Wow. So Donald Trump performed the hat trick successfully despite prognostications from the punditry and sundry dirty tricks from the media, much of which so helpfully aided Clinton toward her ultimate defeat.

But enough of that. Time to look ahead. I'm sure folks everywhere will have advice for the incoming president and his team on all fronts, so I'm going to limit my few remarks to those central to the Center's raison d'etre: American immigration policy and operations.

Mr. Trump campaigned vigorously on a platform of reinstituting respect for the nation's sovereignty, which means above all things that the immigration laws of the United States must be uniformly and routinely enforced. Time to make good on that promise, because it isn't one readily to be forgotten. Read more...

Survey Highlights Popularity of Immigration Enforcement

By Steven A. Camarota, November 7, 2016

Using neutral language, a new poll of 1,000 likely voters conducted November 1-3 by Pulse Opinion Research for the Center for Immigration Studies shows that the public wants immigration laws enforced, and the level of legal immigration reduced. Unlike many other polls, which give the public the false choice of mass deportation or a "path to citizenship", this poll asked respondents if they support causing illegal immigrants to leave the country by enforcing the law. A majority of the public supported this approach; and a majority or plurality supported it among almost all demographic groups, including Hispanics. Moreover, a majority of Americans want a level of legal immigration significantly lower than the current level; few want the kinds of increases contained in the Gang of Eight bill from 2013. Read more...

Good News and Bad About an Immigration/Marriage Fraud Case

By David North, November 7, 2016

There's both good news and bad about an alien in the courts for immigration-related marriage fraud.

The good news, and this is unusual, is that he got caught and the Seventh Circuit has overruled his appeal. He is Kiril Hristov Vidinski, and he paid a citizen to marry him for immigration benefits. He has been an illegal alien in the United States for 18 years. Read more...

Revisiting One-Sided Marriage Fraud

By Dan Cadman, November 7, 2016

Since my last blog posting about the disastrous consequences of one-sided marriage frauds, I have received a considerable amount of correspondence from citizen victims of such frauds. I suspect this may also be true for my colleague, David North, who also has written about the evils of marriage fraud.

The range of victims has been notable, spanning a variety of races and ethnicities, and has included at least one naturalized citizen, showing that even those who have been through the legal immigration system can be blind to the possibility of fraud when the heart overrules the head. Read more...

The Administration Creates Many Quasi-Amnesty Classifications

By David North, November 7, 2016

If you think that creativity is a good thing, you have to admire the Obama administration for the innumerable ways it manages to dream up new classes of agency-defined, specialized quasi-amnesties for subsets of illegal aliens, all without any help from Congress. Read more...

Ecuadorian Illegals Denied Temporary Protected Status

By Kausha Luna, November 4, 2016

On Thursday, the government of Ecuador announced that the United States denied a request for Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for its illegal aliens there.

The Ecuadorian government made a request for TPS in May, after a 7.8-magnitude earthquake struck Ecuador's central coast in April. Read more...

Pope Counsels "Prudence" not Open Borders Regarding Refugees

By Nayla Rush, November 4, 2016

Pope Francis spoke to reporters on his way back from a two-day trip to Sweden this Tuesday. He elaborated on, or rather "corrected his position" on welcoming refugees into Europe. He had previously urged Europe to open its doors to refugees and decried the selfishness of the states that didn't. This week, his message was more nuanced.

The Pope is now recommending that European governments exercise "prudence" and advising them not to accept refugees beyond their hosting capacities. Proper hosting entails providing refugees with "a roof, work, school, language courses" in order for them to "integrate". If not, states will "pay a political price for an imprudent calculation in welcoming more refugees than they can integrate" since non-integrated refugees will then form "ghettos", which is "very dangerous". Read more...