Immigration Blog

Concrete Evidence of the Continuing Plunge in Both Civil and Criminal Immigration Enforcement

By Dan Cadman, January 23, 2016

Two recent reports from Syracuse University's Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse (TRAC) reflect the continued erosion of immigration enforcement under the Obama administration.

On January 20, TRAC reported that criminal prosecution for immigration offenses fell 22.3 percent from November 2014 to November 2015, and more than 36 percent over the course of five years, excluding magistrate court (which deals exclusively with petty offenses). Read more...

South Sudanese TPS Announced Four Days in Advance

By David North, January 22, 2016

If you are a South Sudanese anywhere in the world and you want TPS status in the United States you were given four days notice this morning to scramble to our borders to get what has become a life-long legal status in the United States.

If you are in Cairo or Berlin, for example, and do not have a U.S. visa, but have or can get a Canadian one, you could fly to Montreal later today and spend the weekend walking or skiing across the northern border, arriving before midnight Monday to qualify. If you are lucky and have a little money, you might be able to get to the United States from South Sudan in the allotted time. Read more...

The Washington Post's Cockamamie Constitutional Advice on the "Natural Born Citizen" Requirement for the Presidency

By Stanley Renshon, January 22, 2016

Cockamamie: adjective, Slang.
1. ridiculous, pointless, or nonsensical: full of wild schemes and cockamamie ideas.

As most Americans now realize, the Constitution contains a provision requiring our presidents to be natural-born citizens. And, as anyone who has been paying the least attention to the emerging presidential race knows, one GOP candidate, Ted Cruz, has had questions raised about his legal standing to assume that office because he was born in Canada even though his mother was American. Read more...

On Equitable Distribution of Migrants Arriving in Europe

By Dan Cadman, January 21, 2016

Several decades ago, a spat developed between the Border Patrol and the Investigations Division, both of which were part of the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). The spat was over whether one of those divisions should be stuck processing, on a routine basis, aliens who were apprehended by the other, thus being forced to expend innumerable productive hours for which they would accrue no statistical credit. I won't say which was the aggrieved party; it's irrelevant to the story. Read more...

What, If Anything, Has Marco Rubio Learned about Immigration Reform? (Part 2 of 2)

By Stanley Renshon, January 20, 2016

Immigration is a very complicated policy area and many aspiring presidents like Marco Rubio have an incentive to make it more so. The reason is that they are caught between the need to make primary voter appeals to their party's base and the need to not disqualify themselves in the eyes of the more general electorate. Read more...

Can an Alien Legally Get a Green Card by Marrying Her U.S. Citizen Step-Brother?

By David North, January 20, 2016

This is a story about marriage fraud squared, about it threatening to reach from one generation to the next.

I am leaving out the names and places in this account because they are not significant to the narrative, but real people are involved, and one of them has reached out to the Center seeking assistance and advice.

In a nutshell: Mr. and Mrs. A, both Muslims, were married for years and had three children in the United States. At this point, all five family members are U.S. citizens. Enter Mr. B, another Muslim from the home country. He knows Mr. and Mrs. A. Mr. B arrived with neither a long-term nonimmigrant visa or a green card, something he wants very much. Read more...

What, If Anything, Has Marco Rubio Learned about Immigration Reform? (Part 1 of 2)

By Stanley Renshon, January 20, 2016

Marco Rubio is, in a number of ways, an attractive presidential candidate. He is young, politically articulate, and brings a quintessential American immigrant success story to his candidacy. In other election cycles, he would be among the top-tier candidates, but he isn't, and the fault is primarily his. Read more...

DHS Reports Huge Number of Visitors Overstayed in 2015

By Jessica Vaughan, January 20, 2016

A long-awaited report from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) confirms that overstays are a significant source of illegal immigration. The report identified just over 527,000 foreign visitors who apparently did not depart as required when their authorized stay expired in 2015. Approximately 484,000 were presumed to be still in the United States at the end of 2015, and 416,500 had not departed as of January 4, 2016.

Of these overstaying visitors, 43 percent had entered on a business or tourist visa, 29 percent had entered under the controversial visa waiver program (VWP), and 28 percent had entered from Canada or Mexico. Read more...

Supreme Court to Hear Administrative Amnesty Case

By Jon Feere, January 19, 2016

The Supreme Court has announced that it will hear the 26-state challenge to Obama's DAPA amnesty for illegal aliens who have U.S.-citizen or permanent-resident children. It is anticipated that arguments in United States v. Texas will likely take place in April, with a ruling likely in June. This timeline assures that immigration will remain a key issue in the presidential campaign. Read more...

In the Wall Street Journal, Two Immigration-Boosting Economists Make a False Statement, Duck Debate

By CIS, January 19, 2016

[Guest post by Jason Richwine]

When academics are faced with criticism, one way for them to respond is to carefully explain why they believe the criticisms are invalid. Another option is to pretend the criticism does not exist. Economists Giovanni Peri and Vasil Yasenov chose the latter approach in today's Wall Street Journal. By ignoring counter-arguments, they have further obscured the debate over immigration and wages. Read more...