Immigration Blog

Big Finance Firms Pony Up in Vt. EB-5 Case — Nothing Similar in S.D.

By David North, April 14, 2017

Two large national financial firms have agreed to pay a total of $163.3 million to settle claims against them arising out of the EB-5 (immigrant investor) scandal in Vermont.

Meanwhile nothing of the kind has happened in South Dakota, where the EB-5-related losses were probably even larger. Read more...

GAO's Take on Countering Violent Extremism

By Dan Cadman, April 13, 2017

The Government Accountability Office (GAO) last week published a report that is neither very useful nor credible — "Countering Violent Extremism: Actions Needed to Define Strategy and Assess Progress of Federal Efforts". It mostly reads like bits of progressive shibboleths left over from the Obama administration.

The report represents the kind of abstract thinking we sometimes see from wonks and analysts who are outside the circle of responsibility for ending (or at least minimizing) extreme violence, and therefore talk in terms of metrics, etc. Read more...

Sanctuaries and the "Minor" Crime of Domestic Violence

By Dan Cadman, April 13, 2017

A terrible incident occurred at an elementary school in San Bernardino recently, when an estranged husband entered the premises, shot his wife (a teacher) dead and then turned the gun on himself. Children were also wounded in the attack.

To the best of my knowledge, this most recent tragic incident has nothing directly to do with immigration at all. So why blog about it here? Because it raises the ugly specter of domestic violence, which does have a nexus to immigration. Domestic violence is a sadly recurring event in American life — some estimate that as many as one in every four women will experience some form of domestic abuse in their lives. Read more...

Ninth Circuit Significantly Extends TPS Eligibility for Adjustment of Status

By Andrew R. Arthur, April 12, 2017

A three-judge panel of the Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit on March 31, 2017, in a little-noted decision in Ramirez v. Brown, __F. 3d ___ (9th Cir. 2017), vastly expanded the potential number of aliens who may be eligible for adjustment of status under section 245 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA).

Adjustment of status is a process through which an alien may acquire a green card while in the United States, without having to depart this country and obtain an immigrant visa through consular processing. (See section 245 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA).) It is generally unavailable, however, to aliens who entered the United States illegally. (See section 245(a) of the INA.) Read more...

Cuban Illegal Aliens Allowed to Stay in Mexico

By Kausha Luna, April 12, 2017

On Friday, the Mexican government announced it would begin to regularize the status of 588 Cuban illegal aliens in Nuevo Laredo (including a grant of work permits). After the Obama administration ended the "wet foot, dry foot" policy the Cubans passing through Mexico on their way to the U.S. refused to return to the island. Read more...

Courthouses as Sanctuaries?

By Dan Cadman, April 11, 2017

There are over 300 jurisdictions today that obstruct cooperation with federal immigration efforts, by enacting laws or policies prohibiting police agencies from honoring immigration detainers or providing Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents with the information needed to identify and apprehend alien criminals.

One of those sanctuaries is Multnomah County, Ore., in which an activist open-borders mentality apparently percolates through all three branches of government. Read more...

Sweden Bears Costs of Denial

By Dan Cadman, April 10, 2017

There is a tendency toward schadenfreude in all of us, and it takes a strong person to swallow those tendencies, particularly when the would-be recipient is a smug, deserving prig.

Back in late February, President Donald Trump made a public comment in reference to the risks inherent in taking on large numbers of unassimilated migrants and would-be refugees by referring to the example of Sweden. ("Look what happened last night in Sweden.") Read more...

Politicizing Use of the Word "Police" in the Cause of Open Borders

By Dan Cadman, April 7, 2017

There are a million kinds of stupid, and sometimes I think that our political leaders, one by one, are bound and determined to show the American people each and every one of them. The latest example comes to us courtesy of Rep. Nydia Velazquez (D-N.Y.).

CNN tells us that "A bill introduced Thursday [by Velazquez] aims to thwart Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers from wearing clothing labeled with the words 'police,' arguing the practice is deceiving."

Velazquez's bill comes on the heels of whining by certain open borders and pro-sanctuary groups about federal agents wearing protective vests and other clothing identifying them as both "ICE" (Immigration and Customs Enforcement) and "POLICE". Some allege to be worried that it may lead to confusion. Read more...

News on Sanctuaries and Remittances

By Dan Cadman, April 7, 2017

A few recent immigration items caught my attention:

Fairfax County, Va.: Sanctuary or No? The Washington Post ran a brief article about Virginia's Fairfax County, one of those that constitute part of the greater metro area around our nation's capital, titled "Fairfax County stops short of sanctuary policy in new immigration guidelines". The county supervisors allegedly opted out and instead voted for a wishy-washy, neither fish-nor-fowl policy. As the Post put it, "Virginia's largest jurisdiction on Tuesday declared itself a welcoming and accepting place for immigrants but steered clear of the word 'sanctuary,' a term that could spark a backlash from the Trump administration." Read more...

As Enforcement Tightens, Hondurans Find Alternative Destinations

By Kausha Luna, April 6, 2017

As enforcement tightens at the U.S. border and coyotes continue extortion tactics, Honduran migrants are looking to other countries, including Honduras, as final destinations.

Sally Valladares, coordinator of the Honduran Observatory of International Migration (OMIH), notes that many Hondurans may not take the risk of crossing the U.S. border, given the current political climate, and will instead stay in Mexico. However, Hondurans are also struggling to make it across Mexico's southern border. As of March, the Honduran Ministry of Foreign Affairs registered the return of 12,566 Hondurans so far this year. Of those registered, 5,771 were deported from the United States and 6,787 from Mexico. Consequently, Valladares expects that Honduran migration to Costa Rica, Canada, and Spain may increase. Read more...