Immigration Blog

Shouldn't the Public Know When ICE Releases Criminal Aliens? Georgia Bill Says 'Yes'

By Mark Krikorian, March 14, 2017

John Fonte noted at the National Review site last week that the new DHS office serving victims of criminal aliens (dubbed VOICE) will help challenge the dominant media narrative about immigration. Along with the complementary initiative to systematically provide the public with information on crimes committed by released criminal aliens, Fonte says it represents "the opening round of a long-overdue declaration of (political) war on the sanctuary cities, counties, and states that protect criminal aliens." Read more...

ProPublica's Faulty Look at the Value of Border Searches

By Dan Cadman, March 14, 2017

ProPublica, which bills itself as "journalism in the public interest", recently published a piece by Patrick Lee, "Can Customs and Border Officials Search Your Phone? These Are Your Rights".

The article goes much farther than just phones, and digs generally into border authorities, including stops and searches. But I found it hard to actually get that far, because I myself was stopped — floored, in fact — by the very first paragraph: Read more...

Team USA Faces Hostile "Home" Crowd in Miami at the World Baseball Classic

By David Seminara, March 14, 2017

Team USA played the Dominican Republic in the World Baseball Classic on Saturday night in what was officially considered a "home" game. But the game, won by the Dominican Republic 7-5 was played in Miami, a city that must feel very foreign to American teams facing opponents from Latin American countries. Baseball analyst Ken Rosenthal neatly summarized the overwhelmingly pro-Dominican crowd in Miami in a dispatch with the dateline, "SANTO DOMINGO NORTH". Read more...

Mexico Reaffirms Commitment to Protect Asylum Seekers

By Kausha Luna, March 14, 2017

Mexico and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) are working to strengthen their cooperation in international protection, as the United States tightens immigration enforcement and Central Americans continue to make their way north.

On Friday, Mexico's Ministry of Foreign Affairs held the first Strategic Dialogue on Protection between the Mexican government and UNHCR. The meeting served as a follow up to commitments announced by President Peña Nieto during the UN Summit for Refugees and Migrants, as well as Mexico's commitments under the San Jose Action Statement. Read more...

Foreign Worker Visa Fees Shouldn't Subsidize Labor Market Abuse

By David North, March 14, 2017

One of the management tools potentially available to the government in the immigration field is the size of the fees that it charges for adjudicating employer petitions.

At the very least, the size of the fees should meet the standards of the law (31 USC 9701), which I discuss below, and should not encourage the overuse of foreign workers to the detriment of resident workers. The past administration did not accept the second concept at all, but perhaps the new one will. Read more...

Don't Blame the Art History Majors for the Tech Community's Addiction to Guest Workers

By David Seminara, March 13, 2017

A piece in USA Today last week about the explosive growth of students earning women's and gender studies degrees had me thinking about how the degrees American students obtain impact the immigration debate. The article states that, according to the National Center for Education Statistics, the number of women's and gender studies degrees in the United States has soared by more than 300 percent since 1990, with more than 2,000 degrees conferred in 2015 alone. Read more...

Judicial Overreach 2.0: Here We Go Again

By Dan Cadman, March 13, 2017

On March 6, President Trump issued his much-awaited revised version of the executive order (EO) "Protecting The Nation From Foreign Terrorist Entry Into The United States", ("Travel Ban 2.0" as Center for Immigration Studies Executive Director Mark Krikorian has described it).

The first iteration hit a legal wall at the federal Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, which upheld a "temporary" restraining order of indefinite duration issued by a U.S. District Court judge in Washington State. Neither the district nor appellate court orders were models of judicial probity. (See the series of four different authors' entries on the Center's home page, bundled under "Ninth Circuit Overreach" for many of the objections to the courts' collective decisions.) Read more...

Central Americans Turn to Mexico for Asylum

By Kausha Luna, March 10, 2017

As the Trump administration tightens immigration enforcement, Central Americans are increasingly opting to apply for refugee status in Mexico.

A Spanish language article highlights the experiences of a Salvadoran man and Honduran woman who travelled to Mexico with the intention to cross the border into the United States. In their narratives, the Central Americans explained that after President Trump's election they, like many others, chose to instead stay in Mexico and apply for refugee status. Both of their cases are among those that were rejected, due to the inability to prove that they meet the criteria for refugee status. Read more...

Prosecuting Immigration Crimes in the Interior

By Dan Cadman, March 10, 2017

My colleague Joseph Kolb has written a valuable blog post on how important it is to use prosecution of immigration crimes as one tool in the arsenal to combat illegal immigration to the United States.

In his post, he discusses the Border Patrol's "consequence delivery system" (CDS) — a mapped-out table of ways to ensure that illegal immigration at the border is met with timely and appropriate consequences, one of which is to promptly prosecute offenders. Read more...

DACA: Granting Amnesty to Dreamers Committing Crimes While Abandoning Their Victims

By Ronald W. Mortensen, March 10, 2017

The Obama administration's Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program provides amnesty from serious job-related felonies and other crimes committed by DACA-eligible illegal aliens (often called Dreamers) and their employers while providing no assistance to the American citizen victims of their crimes.

Under President Trump's executive order on immigration enforcement, many Dreamers currently protected by or eligible for DACA would be eligible for deportation because of the crimes that they have committed or are committing. In addition, President Trump's Victims of Immigration Crime Engagement office (VOICE) will help the victims of illegal alien crimes by facilitating "engagement with the victims and their families to ensure, to the extent permitted by law, that they are provided information about the offender, including the offender's immigration status and custody status, and that their questions and concerns regarding immigration enforcement efforts are addressed." Read more...

Ben Carson Isn't the Only One to Have Compared Immigrants and Slaves

By Dan Cadman, March 8, 2017

On his first day on the job, newly sworn in Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Ben Carson made the awful mistake of comparing immigrants and slaves. Read more...

Travel Ban 2.0: Presidential Power on Display

By Mark Krikorian, March 7, 2017

The conclusion of my piece at The National Interest site today:

The new executive order doesn’t establish a new framework for immigration security; its main effect is merely to slow some of the flow for a few months to allow the development of such a framework. As such, the melodrama surrounding it may be hard to explain. But when you understand that it’s the president’s very authority to keep foreigners out of the country that’s being opposed, the melodrama makes more sense.

AG Sessions Should Enhance Border Security by Improving Dismal Prosecution Rates

By Joseph J. Kolb, March 7, 2017

President Trump demonstrated his serious intent to address a problem that has been worsening for some years by signing of executive orders that officially authorized construction of a wall between the United States and Mexico, ceased the frustrating "catch and release" policy imposed on the Border Patrol by the Obama administration, and called for hiring more Border Patrol and ICE agents. For Trump's plan to work, his administration — in particular Attorney General Jeff Sessions — also needs to fix the problem of dismal prosecution rates of illegal aliens apprehended by Border Patrol. Read more...

Winning in Court Often Does Little for the Opponents of Immigration Abuse

By David North, March 7, 2017

While it is good that some citizens and corporations are hauled into court for immigration violations, all too often — despite the nature of their actions — the violators get off with slaps on the wrist.

While there are countless cases of this kind, let me touch on just one recent criminal case and one recent civil case, both in the federal courts, and the unfortunate decision pattern of an obscure agency with an interesting name, the Office of the Chief Administrative Hearing Officer (OCAHO) in the Department of Justice. Read more...

End of Premium Processing for H-1Bs Portends Major Change at USCIS

By John Miano, March 6, 2017

The recent news that the Trump administration is suspending premium processing for H-1B petitions has hit the mainstream media with force. Even massive replacements of Americans by H-1B workers never get this volume of coverage.

This particular action is not in itself significant. However, it portends major change at USICS. (My colleague David North has been thinking along similar lines.) Read more...

Democracy Dies in Darkness; Objectivity and Truth Die in the Pages of the Washington Post

By Dan Cadman, March 6, 2017

The Washington Post has a new logo embedded in its masthead: "Democracy Dies in Darkness".

It took a few moments for me to wipe the tears of laughter from my eyes before I could move on to pondering the unutterable pomposity of these peacock reporters and editors who think that they are shouldering the weight of democracy on their poor meager shoulders. No; more likely the weight they feel is all of those tail feathers dragging behind them as they make their royal progress through the streets of our capital. Read more...

The Center for American Progress Sets a Low Standard for Immigrants ... and So Do the Media

By Jason Richwine, March 6, 2017

In 2012, native households in poverty consumed an average of $14,400 in welfare benefits, while immigrant households in poverty consumed "only" $13,100 of welfare. Does the $1,300 difference mean poor immigrants benefit American taxpayers? Read more...

Coded Signals from USCIS, on a Friday afternoon, about H-1B and EB-5?

By David North, March 6, 2017

Perhaps I am wrong, but I think the new leadership of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services sent us coded messages Friday afternoon about the Trump administration's plans for the H-1B (alien worker) and the EB-5 (immigrant investor) programs.

Friday afternoon is the classic timing of government announcements when the government does not want them to secure too much attention. I know, because in a previous life I, too, played that game. Read more...

Unraveling the Immigrant Education Paradox

By John Wahala, March 5, 2017

In her recent Atlantic piece, Emily Deruy reports on new research that challenges the notion of an "immigrant paradox" — the theory that immigrant students outperform their native-born counterparts, in spite of all the obstacles, but that this upperward mobility is slowed across generations, perhaps because of some deficiency in American culture. Read more...

Fox Provides a Case Study of the Polarized State of the Nation's Immigration Debate

By Jerry Kammer, March 3, 2017

Early in the morning I often work out while watching MSNBC's "Morning Joe" program, which provides a daily look at what the Washington political class is thinking about. But today, after it became obvious that the program was obsessively fixated on the Jeff Sessions story, I switched to "Fox and Friends". There, hosts Ainsley Earhardt and Brian Kilmeade promptly illustrated their network's own fixation — on illegal immigration.

The result, aided by some complementary research, was a case study on the fraught and polarized state of the nation's immigration debate. Read more...

Feds Fail Another Long Island Town with Violent El Salvadoran Immigrant Gangs

By Joseph J. Kolb, March 3, 2017

The relentless gang violence on Long Island, N.Y., fueled by the surge of youths and families from El Salvador is reaching a fever pitch that officials are confronting head-on, despite being left in the dark by federal agencies who fail to communicate new arrival trends and details on resettlement activities to local officials. Read more...

A Call for ICE Transparency in a Deeply Disturbing Case

By Dan Cadman, March 3, 2017

The Daily Caller is reporting on a disturbing case that emanated in the Kansas City area in March 2016, when a previously deported criminal alien is alleged to have killed four individuals and, in fleeing from that offense, killed a fifth individual when trying to steal his car keys.

At a recent Senate hearing, the widow of the fifth victim appeared to testify at the request of Sen. Claire McCaskill of Missouri. According to the Daily Caller, she stated, "Not only has ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement) failed us, our borders have failed us." That may be a fair assessment, if the facts are as alleged. Read more...

Mexican Government Prepares Its Illegals in the U.S. for Detention

By Kausha Luna, March 3, 2017

More than a decade after publishing a comic book showing how to sneak into the United States, Mexico's Ministry of Foreign Affairs has created an infographic video to advise Mexican illegal aliens in the United States how to prepare for possible detention by immigration authorities.

Titled "Recommendations in Case of Immigration Detention", the video outlines seven steps to be taken. These recommendations are divided into two sections. Read more...

ICE Must Act Responsibly, But So Must Advocacy Groups

By Dan Cadman, March 2, 2017

My colleague Jerry Kammer has written a blog post appealing for wisdom at the helms of the nation's two primary border enforcement agencies, Customs and Border Protection (CBP), and Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). It's a valuable piece, and merited being said.

I can't say I know the acting heads over at CBP, but I do know the acting chief of ICE; he is an intelligent and sober man who wouldn't willingly lead the troops astray, though of course there is always the possibility of an untoward field incident — a reality in any kind of police work in any agency at any time.

There is another side to the story, too, though. Read more...

Trump's VOICE and Why It's Counterproductive to Demonize Immigrants

By David Seminara, March 2, 2017

If you'd like to see the country adopt a rule-of-law approach to immigration enforcement, there was plenty to like about President Trump's joint address to Congress on Tuesday night. His calls to "restore integrity and the rule of law to our borders", create a merit-based immigration system, and protect American workers by enforcing our laws were music to my ears.

But I'm not sold on his idea to establish VOICE (Victims Of Immigration Crime Engagement), an office within the Department of Homeland Security that will supposedly help Americans who are victims of crimes committed by immigrants in the country illegally. (And publish quarterly reports "studying the effects of the victimization by criminal aliens present in the United States.") Read more...

Syrian Refugees Resettled in the U.S.: Why Them and Not Others?

By Nayla Rush, March 1, 2017

The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) recently shared on its website the story of a Syrian refugee family who was resettled from Jordan to Dallas. The 30-year-old mechanic, Firas al Ahmad, his wife Samira and their three children fled to Jordan at the end of 2013 when the fighting intensified near their home. The family struggled there for over three years due to the "lack of legal work opportunities" and welcomed UNHCR's offer to resettle in the United States. Once their application approved, they sold their furniture and moved out from their apartment to stay with Firas' dad in the Jordanian city of Irbid. Read more...

Stranded in Mexico, Cubans Seek Refugee Status

By Kausha Luna, March 1, 2017

Over 50 Cubans, whose original intention was to cross the border into the United States, are now asking the Mexican government to allow them to stay in the country. Read more...

Immigration in Trump's Quasi-SOTU

By Mark Krikorian, March 1, 2017

There were two important points related to immigration in last night's speech. The first is that the media hype about Trump possibly floating an amnesty plan was nonsense. It was driven by comments from the president himself to reporters earlier in the day that he’d be open to a deal that offered a non-citizenship amnesty to non-violent illegal aliens and a regular citizenship amnesty for the DACAs (illegals who came before age 16 whom Obama lawlessly amnestied). I don't think that was planned; he’s seemed to embrace a Jeb-like immigration plan in past off-the-cuff comments, only to back away when speaking formally, and that seems to be what happened. Taking this seriously was wishful thinking by the media and paranoia by immigration hawks (including myself) – though the paranoia, or better, eternal vigilance, is always necessary. Read more...

"Me! Me! Me!" The Voice of the Illegal Alien Is Heard in the Land

By David North, February 28, 2017

This may be blasphemy, but there is an eerie resemblance between the egocentric arguments of illegal aliens and the tweets of our egocentric president.

This thought crossed my mind when I read the latest defiant statement of an illegal alien who faces deportation, and deserves it: Jeanette Vizguerra, a multiple law violator whose op-ed piece appeared in the February 25 New York Times. The article was titled "Why I Will Not Leave"; had she or her copy editor been a little more familiar with this country and its traditions she would have written the more compelling "Why I Shall Not Be Moved," as in the Pete Seeger song. Read more...

CPAC Disappoints on Immigration – Again

By Marguerite Telford, February 28, 2017

Last week's Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC), like those in the prior two years, had little to offer people in favor of immigration enforcement and reduced immigration. So it shouldn't be surprising that the beginning of this posting is almost the same as the posting on immigration at CPAC 2016, where the key immigration event focused on how to talk to minorities; Mike Madrid claimed the GOP risked becoming "irrelevant" if the party didn't embrace amnesty and high immigration levels. His advice was ignored by candidate Trump. This year the four-day conference, addressed by President Trump, once again made no attempt to have a meaningful immigration conversation. Read more...