Immigration Blog

Home Sweet Home

By John Rhodes, August 27, 2013

The Economist recently ran an interesting article about the Conservative Party in Britain and its longer-term strategy in preparation for the next general election to be held May 7, 2015. Three policies have emerged in the Conservative Party as central and believed to be popular with the people, and consequently destined to "put the opposition on the wrong side of popular opinion". Economics, of course, loom large. The policy of interest here, however, is not economic, strictly speaking: that of reducing immigration. In the UK, 11.3 percent of the total population is foreign-born, and there are some estimates of almost 900,000 illegal immigrants. Read more...

Unethical Amnesty

By Katherine Telford, August 27, 2013

The following is by Katherine Telford, who was an intern at CIS this summer:

The immigration bill passed by the Senate in June has been a topic of hot debate for months, and continues to be a source of political controversy. It is often, however, portrayed as a moral issue rather than an issue centered on facts. Various religious groups, including Evangelicals and Catholics, have manipulated the problem of immigration in the United States to be a doctrinal issue. Although I do not view the issue as theological, I investigated the bill from a moral perspective. However, I reached a drastically different conclusion regarding the humanity of large-scale amnesty than those critical of individuals opposing S.744. Read more...

Shameless EB-5 Millionaires Overwhelm DHS Agency for the Needy

By David North, August 26, 2013

Hundreds of millionaires and would-be millionaires, both citizens and aliens, have demanded help for their "problems" from a tiny Department of Homeland Security (DHS) agency designed to help befuddled migrants with the complications of the immigration process.

The entity is the Office of the Citizenship and Immigration Services Ombudsman; it had, the last time I looked, 32 employees, and is lodged in the Office of the Deputy Secretary of DHS, not in USCIS itself. Read more...

Presidential Discretion in Immigration Policy: Deja Vu?

By Stanley Renshon, August 26, 2013

The dilemma for real immigration reformers in Congress is that that the president and the executive branch do have some degree of constitutionally mandated discretion in enforcing immigration laws.

Exactly how much is a matter of debate.

Jeffrey Anderson writing in the Weekly Standard of the president's decision not to deport young illegal aliens characterized that initiative as "pure lawlessness". Read more...

Katherine Vargas on the State of Play in Immigration Reform

By Jerry Kammer, August 26, 2013

Katherine Vargas, the White House director of Hispanic media, was interviewed yesterday on "Al Punto", Univision's Sunday morning talk show. Here are some excerpts of her responses to questions from host Jorge Ramos (my translations from Spanish): Read more...

Zuckerberg Shares Stage with Admitted Felon; Turns His Back on Innocent American Children

By Ronald W. Mortensen, August 23, 2013

On August 5, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg shared the stage with Jose Antonio Vargas, an illegal alien and self-acknowledged felon, to support amnesty for illegal aliens. At the same time, Zuckerberg turned his back on innocent Americans, including an untold number of children, who are victims of job-related felonies committed by the vast majority of illegal aliens. Read more...

DHS (Albeit Slowly) and the Courts Move on Immigration Abuse Cases

By David North, August 23, 2013

In recent months federal prosecutors, the courts, the Securities and Exchange Commission, and a state regulatory body in Virginia have moved against immigration abuse on three fronts, with further progress being reported recently in all these cases, two of which involve the controversial EB-5 program for immigrant investors. Read more...

Two Forms of Presidential Immigration Misconduct: Executive Action and Administrative Fiat

By Stanley Renshon, August 23, 2013

Immigration reformers in Congress are worried about a possible presidential Plan B that would bypass Congress altogether and simply change existing immigration law by executive action.

Could the president do this? He already has.

Is this a realistic worry? Yes. Read more...

A One-Time $36 Billion Treasury Raid Would Follow a Major Amnesty

By David North, August 22, 2013

There would be a huge raid on the U.S. Treasury if the Senate's comprehensive immigration bill (S.744) were to become law. It would be retroactive in nature and I estimate it would cost the Treasury roughly $36 billion. Read more...