Immigration Blog

Big Prison — Call Me!

By Mark Krikorian, October 29, 2010

I haven't jumped on the anti-NPR bandwagon following Juan Williams' firing — yes, it was wrong, and yes, there should be no government funding of news operations, but I like NPR and I and CIS have always been treated fairly, both by reporters and talk shows, at both the national level and regional stations. Read more...

New Hispanic Poll on Immigration

By Mark Krikorian, October 28, 2010

The Pew Hispanic Center has a new poll out of Hispanic attitudes related to immigration. Maybe most interesting is this: Read more...

'I Do' – Wink-Wink, Nudge-Nudge

By James R. Edwards Jr., October 27, 2010

The political uproar over Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid's staffer who committed marriage fraud with an immigrant highlights a very serious type of immigration offense. Fake marriages to enable undeserving foreigners to get a visa under false pretenses are just as wrong as sneaking across the border. (CIS has written about marriage fraud here.) Read more...

Shades of Richard Nixon: Obama to Latinos – 'Punish Our Enemies'

By Stanley Renshon, October 27, 2010

In what can only be described as a very ugly exhortation, President Obama called on Latinos to "punish our enemies." That remark, reported by the New York Times, was part of the president's full-scale effort to motivate Latinos to come back to the Democratic fold and help buttress their cause in the elections next week. Read more...

Labor Department Takes Restrictionist Position, Gets Zapped by the Courts

By David North, October 27, 2010

Every so often the U.S. Labor Department does the right thing vis-a-vis immigration, but gets reversed by the courts.

It happened the other day with a Fifth Circuit decision to, in effect, lower wages for H-2B workers to below levels set by the Labor Department, thus indirectly encouraging employers to use more of these workers, and thus to expand legal migration. Read more...

There They Go Again: Non-Citizen Voting Arguments: Round II – 'Fairness'

By Stanley Renshon, October 27, 2010

Moral arguments are central to the American immigration debate. Whatever side of the various immigration policy debates Americans find themselves on, questions of fairness, right and wrong, morality, and appeals to basic ethical principals are never very far away. Moral and ethical terms like, "justice" and "fairness" permeate immigration debate. If you Google the terms "fairness" and "immigration" together, you come up with 1.8 million items. Read more...

Wonder of Wonders

By Mark Krikorian, October 26, 2010

Tevi Troy wrote in a recent Politico piece on Republican trends among Jewish voters at the state level: "Jewish voters, like other voters, are worried about the economy, the deficit, and health care." Add immigration to that list — an American Jewish Committee survey has found that a majority of American Jews support the Arizona immigration law, 52 to 46. Read more...

There They Go Again: Non-Citizen Voting Arguments: Round I

By Stanley Renshon, October 26, 2010

One of the frustrations, perhaps to be expected, in debates about American immigration issues is how often the same hackneyed arguments are repeated. Take the question of whether non-citizens should be allowed to vote. Read more...

Bureau of Land Management Covers Its Tracks

By Janice Kephart, October 26, 2010

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM), usually a quiet and somewhat backwater federal agency, has now taken its position as a placeholder for an Obama administration desperate to keep appearances up that the southwest border is secure. In a small but politically divisive move, the BLM last night did an operation in the Casa Grande area of the Sonora National Monument about a mile south of the major east-west corridor Interstate 8. The operation? Read more...

An Immigration Policy Puzzle: Peruvians vs. Dominicans, Why So Different?

By David North, October 26, 2010

While scrolling through the most recent Pew Hispanic Center data, dealing with country-of-origin profiles of the various Hispanic communities in the United States, I encountered a real puzzle:

Why are the Peruvians in the U.S., (median household income: $51,734) so much more successful than the Dominicans (median household income: $35,644)? Of the 10 Hispanic communities in the U.S. listed by Pew, the Peruvians were at the top of this and several other scales, and the Dominicans were at the bottom. Read more...